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From The Staff

2018's Most Popular Articles

The most popular 2018 articles on our website.

December 31, 2018

From The Staff Communications

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In compiling a top-10 list of this year’s most popular magazine articles on American Scientist's website, we decided to look at what you—our readers—have been searching for the most. So here they are!


10. Drilling with Curiosity

Remotely operating a rover on another planet so that it can gather and analyze samples requires extensive planning, failure work-arounds, and compromise.
(May-June, 2018)


9. America's Cat Is on the Comeback

Mountain lions were extirpated in the eastern and midwestern United States after Europeans settled those areas, but now they are returning. Where will they go?
(November-December, 2018)


8. Many Cultures, One Psychology?

Gains in knowledge about the tremendous variety of cultures around the world are shaking the foundations of research on human behavior and mental processes.
(July-August, 2018)


7. A Chemical History of the Universe

Mapping "star stuff" onto the periodic table
(September-October, 2018)


6. The Gene-Editing Conversation

Public dialogue about the new technology will require major investments from scientists, journalists, and philanthropists.
(January-February, 2018)


5. Reasonable Versus Unreasonable Doubt

Although critiques of scientific findings can be used for misleading purposes, skepticism still plays a crucial role in producing robust research.
(March-April, 2018)


4. Science Comics' Super Powers

Communicators are turning to comics to make science pop.
(July-August, 2018)


3. Imaging Without Lenses

New imaging systems, microscopes, and sensors rely on computation, rather than traditional lenses, to produce a digital image.
(January-February, 2018)


2. Is Drug Addiction a Brain Disease?

This popular claim lacks evidence and leads to poor policy.
(May-June, 2018)


1. The Secret History of Gravitational Waves

Contrary to popular belief, Einstein was not the first to conceive of gravitational waves—but he was, eventually, the first to get the concept right.
(March-April, 2018)

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