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March-April 2016 cover

On the Cover

March-April 2016
Volume 104, Number 2

In temperate forests, one of the first signs of spring is when the trees unfurl their leaves. As the climate warms worldwide, leaves are emerging earlier than a century ago, but not all the organisms that depend on them are changing in the same way or as quickly. The responses of different tree species to warming springtime temperatures also varies widely....


FEATURE ARTICLES

The Visual World of Infants *

Russell D. Hamer

Discovering what babies can see has been a formidable challenge, but research methods now provide an objective picture of their surprising visual abilities.


Spring Budburst in a Changing Climate *

Richard B. Primack, Amanda S. Gallinat

Henry David Thoreau’s 160-year-old field notes document the changing life in the woods, as a warming climate jumbles the timing of annual springtime schedules.


Meat-Eating Among the Earliest Humans

Briana Pobiner

Evidence of meat-eating among our distant human ancestors is hard to find and even harder to interpret, but researchers are beginning to piece together a coherent picture.


* access restricted to members and subscribers


SCIENTISTS’ NIGHTSTAND

Science Books in Six

American Scientist’s readers, writers, and editors share the science books that struck their fancy in 2015—summed up in just six words!

See all book reviews for this issue


DEPARTMENTS

FROM THE EDITORS

The Benefits of Science

Jamie L. Vernon

COMPUTERING SCIENCE

A 3D Twist for Flat Photos

Manipulating digital photos to fill in their missing parts could be useful in everything from furniture design to accident scene reconstruction.

Natasha Kholgade Banerjee

ENGINEERING

The Merritt Parkway and Other Driving Respites*

Smaller roads offer an escape from the strangled traffic of I-95, as well as a detour into the pre-interstate highway era of automobile travel.

Henry Petroski

SPOTLIGHT

DNA Damage and Nanoparticles

Q&A with Bryant C. Nelson, a research chemist, who is developing methods to quantify whether nanoparticles cause genetic damage.

Fenella Saunders

PERSPECTIVE

How to Recruit and Retain Underrepresented Minorities

From kindergarten through fulltime positions, what works to engage aspiring minority researchers in studying ocean science?

Ashanti Johnson and Melanie Harrison Okoro

HYPOTHESIS

Angiogenesis, Aging, and Alzheimer’s Disease

Can a form of treatment that promotes the growth of new capillaries, improving blood flow in the brain and elsewhere, ease old age and Alzheimer’s disease?

Charles T. Ambrose

Briefings

LETTERS TO THE EDITORS

Steel’s Contentious Birth

A “Garage” for a Bridge?


SIGMA XI TODAY (PDF)


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