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Ludwig Mies van der Rohe: Father of 'Less Is More' Architecture

from the Christian Science Monitor

Architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, the subject of Tuesday's Google Doodle icon, was famous for his dictum "Less is more" and his minimalism design style.

The architect, who was often known only as "Mies," used "modern" materials--industrial steel and glass--to create the "bones" of interiors, while emphasizing open spaces and simplicity.

Mies was born in 1886 in Aachen, Germany and, after a stint in his father's stone carving business, traveled to Berlin to work with architect Bruno Paul. After apprenticing himself to Peter Behrens, another architect, and working on the embassy for the German Empire in St. Petersburg, Russia, during his time with Behrens, Mies started his own architectural firm in Berlin in 1912. He married the next year.

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