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On the Cover

January-February 2017
Volume 105, Number 1

Artificial endosymbioses hold promise for transferring their benefits to novel hosts. In mosquitoes, for example, a bacteria of the genus Wolbachia, which can live in the ovaries or testes of a variety of insects, are under exploration for their potential to cause population declines or to limit virus transmission in diseases....


FEATURE ARTICLES

Blood, Guts, and Hope *

Carl M. Schoellhammer, Robert Langer, C. Giovanni Traverso

Treatment of gastrointestinal tissue with ultrasound makes it more permeable to medications that can alleviate inflammatory bowel disease.


The Prospects of Artificial Endosymbioses *

Ryan Kerney, Zakiya Whatley, Sarah Rivera, David Hewitt

The use of beneficial microbes holds promise for public health and food production, but has trade-offs that are not yet fully understood.


Photoshopping the Universe

Travis A. Rector, Kimberly Arcand, Megan Watzke

Astronomers produce beautiful images by manipulating raw telescope data, but such processing makes images more accurate, not misrepresentative of reality.


* access restricted to members and subscribers


SCIENTISTS’ NIGHTSTAND

Soviet Blocks

Jesse Schell

The story behind the pioneering game Tetris is complex, spanning the worlds of technology, psychology, entertainment, politics, and business. Thirty years on, two books tell the tale: The Tetris Effect, by technology journalist Dan Ackerman, and Tetris, by Ignatz Award–winning cartoonist Box Brown. Each ushers readers along a distinct and enlightening path.

See all book reviews for this issue


DEPARTMENTS

FROM THE EDITORS

Science in the Post-Truth Era

Jamie L. Vernon

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION

Ending the Crisis of Complacency in Science

To survive the Trump administration, scientists need to invest in a strategic vision that mobilizes social change.

Matthew Nisbet

COMPUTING SCIENCE

Computational Thinking in Science

The computer revolution has profoundly affected how we think about science, experimentation, and research.

Peter J. Denning

INFOGRAPHIC

Moon Clock


PERSPECTIVE

The Hand-in-Hand Spread of Mistrust and Misinformation in Flint

The water crisis not only left infrastructure and government agencies in need of cleaning up; the information landscape was also messy.

Siddhartha Roy

ENGINEERING

Setbacks and Prospects for Autonomous Vehicles*

Self-driving cars seemed ready to keep going ahead, but some recent incidents have slowed their development.

Henry Petroski

SIGHTINGS

Now In Color

Even though they are far smaller than the shortest wavelength of visible light, tiny biological objects can finally be imaged in multiple hues.

Robert Frederick

SPOTLIGHT

Neanderthals Reenvisioned

New techniques for determining the age of fossils and sediments are providing insights into human origins.

Sandra J. Ackerman

First Person: M. V. Ramana

Q&A about the future prospects of nuclear power.

Fenella Saunders

Briefings


LETTER TO THE EDITORS

Win-Win Textbooks


Camelot of Mathematics


Endangered Seeds


SIGMA XI TODAY (PDF)


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