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On the Cover

November-December 2016
Volume 104, Number 6

The human family gained a previously unknown relative last year when a great trove of fossil bones and fragments was discovered in a cave outside Johannesburg, South Africa. Researchers determined that the fossils represented a new species, which they named Homo naledi; however, because the species exhibits a puzzling mixture of new and old features....


FEATURE ARTICLES

Harnessing the Web to Track the Next Outbreak *

Aranka Anema, Carly R. Winokur, Chi Bahk, Sumiko Mekaru, Nicholas Preston, John S. Brownstein

Innovations in data science and disease surveillance are changing the way we respond to public health threats.


An Updated Prehistory of the Human Pelvis

Caroline VanSickle

Recent fossil discoveries are raising new questions about how the modern human pelvis developed its unique shape.


Radio from the Sky

Francis Graham-Smith

New, large telescope dishes and widespread arrays of receivers continue to provide insights into the nature of the universe.


The Challenge of Survival for Wild Infant Baboons *

Susan C. Alberts

Over the past 40 years, researchers have learned that social relationships can mean life or death for young primates.


* access restricted to members and subscribers


SCIENTISTS’ NIGHTSTAND

Salem’s Savant

Daniel S. Silver

An Enlightenment mathematician and astronomer, Nathaniel Bowditch improved many areas of life in the early American republic and earned praise both at home and abroad. Yet today his work has largely been forgotten. In Nathaniel Bowditch and the Power of Numbers, Tamara Plakins Thornton reminds readers why Bowditch was so influential and ponders his legacy.

See all book reviews for this issue


DEPARTMENTS

FROM THE EDITORS

Maintaining the Momentum

Jamie L. Vernon

ETHICS

The Other Open-Access Debate

Alternative educational resources need to be further developed to counteract an increasingly costly textbook burden on university students.

David Harris and Mark A. Schneegurt

ENGINEERING

Lecterns Are Not Podiums*

And wastebaskets should not be placed too close to either.

Henry Petroski

INFOGRAPHIC

The Chemistry of Fingerprinting


LETTER TO THE EDITORS

Mosquito Vectors of Zika


Traffic Lights Near and Far


Studying Rat Empathy


Delaying School for Sleep

PERSPECTIVE

The Fates of Channel Island Foxes and Isle Royale Wolves

When is low genetic diversity worth preserving for distinctiveness, and when is it dooming a population to extinction?

Pat Shipman

SIGHTINGS

Hungry Little Beasts

A low-emission method of combustion is full of puzzles and potential.

Robert Frederick

SPOTLIGHT

Graphene Takes Flight

Single layers of carbon atoms give airplane wings a boost in strength and performance.

Katie L. Burke

First Person: Herman O. Sintim

Q&A about novel ways to target bacteria that cause illnesses.

Fenella Saunders

Briefings


SIGMA XI TODAY (PDF)


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