Subscribe
Subscribe
MY AMERICAN SCIENTIST
LOG IN! REGISTER!
SEARCH
 
Logo IMG

On the Cover

March-April 2017
Volume 105, Number 2

Drawing inspiration from forms found in nature, artist Rogan Brown uses a scalpel or laser to cut intricate patterns into hundreds of microlayers of paper. (The cover features a detail from his paper sculpture Kernel.) As new technologies increasingly dominate the popular culture....


FEATURE ARTICLES

The Biodiversity Conservation Paradox *

Mark Vellend

Even in places where nature is perceptibly altered by human actions, the number of species does not necessarily decline.


Metformin: Out of Backwaters and into the Mainstream *

Philip A. Rea, Anderson Y. Tien

This ubiquitous diabetes drug took a convoluted route to become the standard of care, and is still finding new uses.


Risks and Benefits of Radiation

Timothy J. Jorgensen

The story of radon’s study in public health can be a guide for how to best weigh the pros and cons of radiation use.


* access restricted to members and subscribers


DEPARTMENTS

FROM THE EDITORS

Curiosity Expands our Worldview

Jamie L. Vernon

ARTS LAB

Art and Science in the Romantic Imagination

Creativity assumes a variety of natural, yet imaginary, forms in these painstakingly carved paper sculptures.

Rogan Brown

ENGINEERING

Bottle and Can Openers as Levers*

A simple machine can take on myriad forms to get the job done, but all the variations still operate on the same mechanical principles.

Henry Petroski

COMPUTING SCIENCE

How to Detect Faked PhotosScience

Techniques that analyze the consistency of elements within an image can help to determine whether it is real or manipulated.

Hani Farid

INFOGRAPHIC

Lighting Up the Animal Kingdom


LETTER TO THE EDITORS

An Autonomous Trip


Colonoscopy Care


Confidence in Science


Nuclear Power Debate


PERSPECTIVE

A New Window on Alien Atmospheres

The James Webb Space Telescope, originally intended for scanning the outer reaches of the cosmos, is now expected to break new ground exploring exoplanets.

Kevin Heng

SIGHTINGS

Nanoparticle Visions

Too small to be seen by the human eye, nanoparticles are already transforming many scientific fields, from electrical engineering to materials science. Now scientists are working to optimize production.

Robert Frederick

SPOTLIGHT

Pressure in the Pink

A pressure-sensitive paint is helping NASA accurately model the extreme forces that spacecraft experience during launch.

Fenella Saunders

First Person: George Weiblen

Q&A with one of the first plant biologists registered to study Cannibus.

Katie L. Burke

Briefings


SIGMA XI TODAY (PDF)


Subscribe to American Scientist