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May-June 2010 cover

On the Cover

May-June 2010 Volume 98, Number 3

The developmental paths of the human eye—shown on the cover in a colored scanning electron micrograph during the eighth week of gestation—and the octopus eye are examples of convergent evolution. ...


FEATURE ARTICLES

To Signal Is Human *

Alex (Sandy) Pentland

Real-time data mining unmasks the power of imitation, kith and charisma in our face-to-face social networks


Revealing the True Solar Corona

Richard Woo

Imaging may have inadvertently led astrophysicists astray in understanding the Sun


Development Influences Evolution *

Katherine E. Willmore

A range of factors—including genetics and physics, location and timing— can either constrain an animal’s features or amplify changes


To See for One’s Self

Darin L. Wolfe

The art of autopsy has a long history and an uncertain future


* access restricted to members and subscribers


SCIENTISTS’ BOOKSHELF

Enigmatic Wisps

David Kaiser

A review of A Brilliant Darkness: The Extraordinary Life and Mysterious Disappearance of Ettore Majorana, the Troubled Genius of the Nuclear Age, by João Magueijo. In addition to examining theories about what became of Majorana when he disappeared permanently in 1938, Magueijo explains why Majorana’s ideas about the neutrino are once again on the minds of physicists, now that evidence has begun to accumulate that the elusive neutrino has some tiny but nonzero mass

See all book reviews for this issue.


DEPARTMENTS

MACROSCOPE

Designing Minds

How should we explain the origins of novel behaviors?

Edward A. Wasserman and Mark S. Blumberg

COMPUTING SCIENCE

The Bootstrap

Statisticians can reuse their data to quantify the uncertainty of complex models

Cosma Shalizi

ENGINEERING

Reusing Infrastructure*

When the need for a bridge changes, sometimes so too can the bridge

Henry Petroski

MARGINALIA

Darwin's Literary Models

It may not be structured like a journal paper, but On the Origin of Species was written according to classical rules of rhetoric

Keith Thomson

SIGHTINGS

Detecting Irregular Gravity

Catherine Clabby

SCIENCE OBSERVER

If Not for Plants, Could Rivers Bend?

Geologists strengthen the case that early rooted plants engineered the look of modern rivers

Catherine Clabby

Amphibious Caterpillars

Hawaii hosts the first-known insects that are equally happy living underwater or on dry land

Fenella Saunders

All Systems Go

The Institute for Systems Biology celebrates an anniversary, a triumph in impact ranking and a growing role in the ecology of life science

Morgan Ryan

In the News

LETTERS TO THE EDITORS

The Wrong Culprit?

Harness DNA Memory

Can't Break that Law

Water Molecules Not Repelled

SIGMA XI TODAY (PDF)


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