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If you receive American Scientist in the digital format, you'll receive an email notice when each new issue becomes available. You can use the links that the email message contains to view the issue, download the issue as a PDF, and download it to an iPad.

Due to the current business model, we cannot provide a link to the complete PDF on the American Scientist website.

Where is my archive back issue?

When you receive an email notice from our service provider QMags, the digital issue will be added to your user account archives on the QMags website. You can access your archive by logging on to with your email address and password.

If you do not know your password, enter your email address, leave the password field blank and click "login." The password will be emailed to you.

How do I download an issue on my iPad?

To access the American Scientist app, go to the iTunes App Store from your iPad, search for American Scientist magazine and download the free app. Once downloaded you must register using your Qmags ID and Password you only need to do this once.

Your Qmags ID : This is the email address where you receive your digital edition.

Your Qmags Password : If you have forgotten your Qmags password, touch "Forgot Password" and the password will be emailed to you.

The original password from Qmags will be different from the password you may have used when registering on the American Scientist website.

Next, touch the cover of the selected issue, and it will download. The current issue will be on the top left.

Can I read the issue on other tablets or e-readers?

The downloadable PDF is best viewed using Adobe Acrobat—either the full version or the free Adobe Reader.

As a PDF, the digital edition may be viewed on most tablet computers, although it is seriously compromised on non-color devices, such as the original Kindle and Nook, and is cumbersome to read on small smartphone screens.

Download file Digital Edition Help (PDF) 

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