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Pizza Lunch Podcasts


Audio Exclusive: An Interview with Fracking Expert Avner Vengosh

Katie L. Burke

Avner Vengosh is a geochemist at Duke University who studies water quality issues posed by hydraulic fracturing and shale gas extraction. “We try to provide an objective picture of what the issues are and how we can cope with them,” says Vengosh. Listen to Associate Editor Katie L. Burke’s interview with Vengosh, portions of which were published as a Q & A in our July–August issue.

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3D Printing Replacement Body Parts

Katie-Leigh Corder, Fenella Saunders

2015-08WyskMMClick to Enlarge ImageResearchers in the regenerative medicine field are now amplifying their efforts with 3D-printing technology, which can now use organic materials to create scaffolds that cells need to grow into their final forms.

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The Heart’s New Beat: Evolution

Katie L. Burke

2015-06DunnPodcast

Biologist Rob Dunn of North Carolina State University sat down to discuss the evolution of the heart, including why dog years are different than people years and the fascinating overlooked research of cardiologist Helen Taussig. (Image from North Carolina State University.)

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Engineering Around Extreme Events

Katie-Leigh Corder, Fenella Saunders

AnaBarrosPodcast

Extreme events, such as super floods and hurricanes, are becoming more common, so civil engineers are trying to adapt civil infrastructure such as bridges to these unpredictable and sometimes devastating meteorological events. Engineer Ana Barros discusses how engineering can prepare us for extreme weather events, but also how changing climate and population conditions can affect the ability of infrastructure to hold up over time.

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An Inside View: Tales Told by a Doctor

Katie-Leigh Corder, Sandra J. Ackerman

TerrenceHoltBookClick to Enlarge ImageTerrence Holt, PhD , is a research associate professor in the Department of Social Medicine and a clinical assistant professor of geriatric medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC). Alongside his medical background, he is also an adjunct assistant professor of English and comparative literature also at UNC, where he teaches courses on medicine and society and on the writing of autobiographical narrative.

Sandra J. Ackerman, senior editor at American Scientist interviewed Dr. Holt about his most recent book, Internal Medicine, and how he sees the intersection of medicine and narrative.

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The Promise and Peril of Drones

Katie-Leigh Corder, Katie L. Burke

CummingsDrones

The automation of tasks at work and at home is just around the corner, including driving cars, piloting planes, delivering packages, and transporting weapons. Unmanned aerial vehicles, also known as drones, are rapidly evolving to meet both society’s and the military’s needs in automation and better efficiency.

Dr. Missy Cummings, an associate professor at Duke University’s Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and the director of the Humans and Autonomy Lab, is at the forefront of drone technologies. During her time as one of the first female fighter pilots in the US Navy, Cummings observed that computers could take off and land a plane more precisely than humans. Because of this breakthrough and her fascination with this growing technology, she made a career change and began human–drone interaction research.


Photo from Duke University's Human and Autonomy Lab: hal.pratt.duke.edu/people

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Compounds Treat Substance Abuse and Parkinson's Disease

Katie L. Burke, Katie-Leigh Corder

CarrollPodcastF. Ivy Carroll is a distinguished fellow for medicinal chemistry at the Research Triangle Institute, where he is the director of their Center for Organic and Medicinal Chemistry. Carroll has spent more than 30 years studying potential treatments for substance abuse. Among them are two compounds, RTI-336 and JDTic, that he and colleagues studied as potential treatments for cocaine abuse, as well as a potential diagnostic agent for Parkinson’s disease, called Iodine-123 RTI-55.

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Through the Theoretical Glass

Katie L. Burke

2013-09Charbonneau

It’s difficult to envision what dimensions beyond 3D are, and why physicists, chemists, and mathematicians want to study them. Duke University chemist Patrick Charbonneau studies the theory behind the formation of glass, tackling questions about an area of research called the glass problem. His research has helped progress this field to a new paradigm. American Scientist associate editor Katie L. Burke interviewed him in September 2013.

Photo credit: Les Todd/Duke Photography.

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Preventing Spread of an Avian Influenza Strain as an Army Veterinarian

Katie-Leigh Corder, Katie L. Burke

YingstVetWhen a person says he or she works in the U.S. Army, people may immediately assume he or she works in combat or engineering. But there are a vast and unique set of skills in the U.S. Army, especially in science and research. An army veterinarian discusses his journeys to different places in the Middle East and Northeast Africa to study various zoonotic diseases (contagious diseases transmittable between animals and humans), including influenza A virus subtype H5N1.

Lieutenant Colonel Sam Yingst, PhD, is the chief of the U.S. Army’s Epidemiology and Disease Surveillance Department and studies many zoonotic diseases worldwide by assisting those in developing countries with their research.

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Redesigning the Human Genome with DNA-Binding Proteins

Katie-Leigh Corder, Katie L. Burke

Gene therapy

Gene therapy and genomic engineering are rapidly burgeoning areas of research. Dr. Charles Gersbach of Duke University sat down with associate editor Katie L. Burke to discuss the history of gene therapy and what we can do now that we couldn’t do even a few years ago.

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Total Records : 40


 

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Audio: Using Computing to Advance Toxicology

Chemicals have changed our lives, providing new products and capabilities, but sometimes causing harm to ourselves and the environment... (click the link above to read more).

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