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Rolling the Dice on Big Data

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Dr. Ilse Ipsen, a professor in the Department of Mathematics at North Carolina State University, goes in-depth about how mathematicians can use the Monte Carlo method, and other tools, to wrestle with the deluge of data emerging from the wide variety of scientific research areas.

Dr. Ipsen's research interests include numerical linear algebra, matrix theory, numerical analysis, randomized algorithms, and others. She has written countless papers and software regarding her research as well as on the Monte Carlo method and its use on big data. Also, Dr. Ipsen is the associate director for the Statistical and Applied Mathematical Institute (SAMSI). SAMSI focuses on forging a synthesis of statistical sciences and applied mathematical sciences with disciplinary science to tackle difficult, yet important data- and model-driven scientific challenges.

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In this podcast, Dr. Ipsen speaks with associate editor, Katie Burke, about her research and viewpoints on using the Monte Carlo method and big data.

Podcast music is “Spot,” by Ardent Octopus, courtesy of Mevio’s Music Alley.

Funding for Pizza Lunches is provided by the North Carolina Biotechnology Center.

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