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Robots in Clinical and Home Environments

Listen to the podcast:

Dr. Ron Alterovitz, an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of North LungFlexibleRobotCarolina at Chapel Hill, talks about current and future research and challenges involving robots used in clinical and home environments. 

Dr. Alterovitz and his team apply algorithms to emerging robots that have the potential to enhance physician performance, improve patient care and autonomously assist people in their homes. An example involves medical devices like steerable needles and flexible tentacle-like robots that can assist surgeons reach their clinical target. In the home, robots are programmed to assist the elderly and people with disabilities.

Watch this video created by Dr. Alterovitz and Gu Ye at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill:

In this podcast, Dr. Alterovitz talks about his research on creating algorithms for robots and their use mainly in surgical and home environments.

Podcast music is “Spot,” by Ardent Octopus, courtesy of Mevio’s Music Alley.

Funding for Pizza Lunches is provided by the North Carolina Biotechnology Center.

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