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PIZZA LUNCH PODCASTS

How You Can Better Communicate Your Science

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Most scientists will tell you that one of the inspirations for their work is to somehow benefit mankind, whether that’s through new medicines or a better understanding of the formation of the universe. But how can scientists ensure that mankind knows about their work? 

Science Conference Example

Effective communication about science to the public has been the life work of science author and journalist  Dennis Meredith, whose career as a science communicator has included service at some of the country's leading research universities, including MIT, Cal tech, Cornell, Duke and the University of Wisconsin. In 2012, Meredith was inducted as an Honorary Life Member of Sigma Xi, and he is the Chair for American Scientist 's Committee on Communications and Publications. 

He wrote Explaining Research, which equips scientists and engineers with the necessary tools and techniques on explaining their work to various types of audiences.

In this podcast, he discussed with American Scientist managing editor, Fenella Saunders, some of the ways he’s found to help scientists become more effective communicators.

Podcast music is “Spot,” by Ardent Octopus, courtesy of Mevio’s Music Alley.

Funding for Pizza Lunches is provided by the North Carolina Biotechnology Center.

See our complete list of Pizza Lunch Podcasts


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