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Sex Is for Real

Mary S. Calderone

Vol. 57, No. 4 (WINTER 1969)

SEX IS FOR REAL (Human Sexuality & Sexual Responsibility). W. Dalrymple; 162 pages; $4.95; McGraw Hill Book Co., 1969.

This is a book that well and clearly fits into the need of intelligent and mature young people today for discussion about all aspects of life—in this particular case about all aspects of human sexuality. Realistically recognizing that preachment and moralization alienate, that facts alone are dull, it skillfully threads its way between the two extremes by dropping important concepts into the mind of the reader on which to base his decision making.

The facts are there, of course, and correctly as might be expected from a physician who is Director of Health Services at Princeton University. But more important than the facts are the attitudes of the writer: he makes his own value positions clear, but leaves the way open for the reader to make his; strongly but delicately he clarifies the importance of the committed relationship, yet just as abundantly testifies to the beauty and warmth of the physical.

It is written at a rather high language level, and for this reason will be most useful for mature young people in high schools with a high standard of literacy. It should also be very useful for college freshmen who have come from schools that have failed to prepare them for the sexual issues and decisions that inevitably face college young people today.—Mary S. Calderone, Executive Director, Sex Information and Education Director, Sex Information and Education Council of the U.S. (SIECUS)

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