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Institutional Licensing

Annual Site Licensing Fees

An American Scientist Online site license allows institutions to provide users with  24-hour access to all content published in American Scientist magazine. The contents of the site include both the current issue and an archive of back issues, as well as other related content. They are fully searchable, and full-text search results can be viewed and printed by the user.

Download the American Scientist Institutional Site Licensing Agreement Form.

Universities, Colleges and Academic Research Institutions

Full-time equivalents:

  • 5,000 or fewer: $275
  • 5,001 – 30,000: $375
  • 30,001 or more: $575

Public Libraries, High Schools and Not-for-Profits

  • Flat annual fee: $275

Corporations, Other For-Profits and Government Agencies

Full-time equivalents:

  • 5,000 or fewer: $375
  • 5,001 - 30,000: $825
  • 30,001 or more: $1,175

All prices listed above include an institutional print subscription to American Scientist magazine.

Other Categories:

For further information on pricing or about acquiring a site license to American Scientist, email us at: subs@amsci.org.



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JSTOR, the online academic archive, contains complete back issues of American Scientist from 1913 (known then as the Sigma Xi Quarterly) through 2005.

The table of contents for each issue is freely available to all users; those with institutional access can read each complete issue.

View the full collection here.


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