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PODCASTS: From Balloons to Space Stations: Studying Cosmic Rays

CREAM Inflating

Cosmic rays have mysterious qualities about them that scientists continue to research in order to better understand their origins and composition. Dr. Eun-Suk Seo, a professor of physics at the University of Maryland, and her colleagues, fly enormous balloons as large as a football stadium and a volume of 40-million-cubic feet for extended periods over Antarctica to study particles coming from cosmic rays before they break up in the atmosphere.

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Latest Blog

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Regulatory DNA Variants in Disease: Too Much (or Too Little) of a Good Thing
By Brian J. Abraham
Decades of research into genetic disorders have scrutinized but a tiny part of the human genome—the part with the code for making proteins. This tiny part yielded the causes of sickle-cell disease and hemophilia and inspired a slew of labs to seek causes for more diseases in protein-coding DNA. But those labs’ quests returned surprising results.

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