Subscribe
Subscribe
MY AMERICAN SCIENTIST
LOG IN! REGISTER!
SEARCH
 
Logo IMG

If you receive American Scientist in the digital format, you'll receive an email notice when each new issue becomes available. You can use the links that the email message contains to view the issue, download the issue as a PDF, and download it to an iPad.

Due to the current business model, we cannot provide a link to the complete PDF on the American Scientist website.

Where is my archive back issue?

When you receive an email notice from our service provider QMags, the digital issue will be added to your user account archives on the QMags website. You can access your archive by logging on to www.qmags.com with your email address and password.

If you do not know your password, enter your email address, leave the password field blank and click "login." The password will be emailed to you.

How do I download an issue on my iPad?

To access the American Scientist app, go to the iTunes App Store from your iPad, search for American Scientist magazine and download the free app. Once downloaded you must register using your Qmags ID and Password you only need to do this once.

Your Qmags ID : This is the email address where you receive your digital edition.

Your Qmags Password : If you have forgotten your Qmags password, touch "Forgot Password" and the password will be emailed to you.

The original password from Qmags will be different from the password you may have used when registering on the American Scientist website.

Next, touch the cover of the selected issue, and it will download. The current issue will be on the top left.

Can I read the issue on other tablets or e-readers?

The downloadable PDF is best viewed using Adobe Acrobat—either the full version or the free Adobe Reader.

As a PDF, the digital edition may be viewed on most tablet computers, although it is seriously compromised on non-color devices, such as the original Kindle and Nook, and is cumbersome to read on small smartphone screens.

Digital Edition Help (PDF)


comments powered by Disqus
 

Connect With Us:

Facebook Icon Sm Twitter Icon Google+ Icon Pinterest Icon RSS Feed Instagram Icon

Subscribe to Free eNewsletters!


Latest Multimedia

PODCASTS: From Balloons to Space Stations: Studying Cosmic Rays

CREAM Inflating

Cosmic rays have mysterious qualities about them that scientists continue to research in order to better understand their origins and composition. Dr. Eun-Suk Seo, a professor of physics at the University of Maryland, and her colleagues, fly enormous balloons as large as a football stadium and a volume of 40-million-cubic feet for extended periods over Antarctica to study particles coming from cosmic rays before they break up in the atmosphere.

To view all multimedia content, click "Latest Multimedia."


Latest Blog

201503Abraham205

Regulatory DNA Variants in Disease: Too Much (or Too Little) of a Good Thing
By Brian J. Abraham
Decades of research into genetic disorders have scrutinized but a tiny part of the human genome—the part with the code for making proteins. This tiny part yielded the causes of sickle-cell disease and hemophilia and inspired a slew of labs to seek causes for more diseases in protein-coding DNA. But those labs’ quests returned surprising results.

Click "Latest Blog" to view all blogs.


RSS Feed Subscription

Receive notification when new content is posted from the entire website, or choose from the customized feeds available.


Read Past Issues on JSTOR

JSTOR, the online academic archive, contains complete back issues of American Scientist from 1913 (known then as the Sigma Xi Quarterly) through 2005.

The table of contents for each issue is freely available to all users; those with institutional access can read each complete issue.

View the full collection here.


Subscribe to American Scientist