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Pizza Lunch Podcasts


Retracing the Evolution of African Penguins

African Penguins"Penguins are 10 times older than humans and have been here for a very, very long time," said Daniel Ksepka, Ph.D., a researcher at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent). Dr. Ksepka researches the evolution of penguins and how they came to inhabit the African continent.

Because penguins have been around for over 60 million years, their fossil record is extensive. Fossils that Dr. Ksepka and his colleagues have discovered provide clues about migration patterns and the diversity of penguin species.

Dr. Ksepka goes into more depth about how his research is piecing together the evolutionary puzzle of penguins and other related bird species.

Watch his interview below to learn more about the fascinating evolutionary world of penguins:


Read his blog, March of the Fossil Penguins.

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Science Hangout: Dr. Gruss on Advancing Research

Download the MP3 audio file for this podcast.

In American Scientist 's first Google Hangout On Air, managing editor Fenella Saunders talks with Prof. Dr. Peter Gruss, president of the Max Planck Society, which is a nonprofit research organization that has promoted research at its own institutes since 1948.

He discusses the need to grow basic research, the pluses and minuses for using grants as the main source of support for researchers, the role of business funding in science, the importance of multidisciplinary collaborations, the need to support women in science careers, and the gains created by communicating science well to the general public.

Watch the recorded video from the discussion below:



Direct link to video on YouTube: http://youtu.be/KTuWwVwNl8I

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Smart Materials Used to Treat Uterine Fibroids

Download the MP3 audio file for this podcast.

Dr. Darlene Taylor Uterine FibroidClick to Enlarge Imageis an associate professor in the Department of Chemistry at North Carolina Central University. She uses molecular engineering to develop what she calls “smart materials”- substances that can sense and respond in some way to a change in their environment. Perhaps the most exciting use for smart materials is helping to deliver powerful drugs to specific target sites deep inside the body without affecting other tissues along the way.

These nano-substances can react to environmental changes, such as temperature changes, and can break down over time, which, in turn, can then release certain materials, such as a drug, to a specific area in the body. Taylor compares this substance to Jell-O with fruit inside it; a person can gouge around with a spoon and dislodge the fruit but the matrix, in this case the Jell-O, still keeps its original wiggly state. By using these substances, she is researching ways to provide a noninvasive therapy option for treating uterine fibroids.

Read her American Scientist article from February - March 2014: "Engineered Molecules for Smarter Medicines"

Read her publications.

Dr. Taylor discusses her research in an interview with Sandra Ackerman, senior editor at American Scientist magazine.

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Pancreatic Cancer and More Effective Treatments

Download the MP3 audio file for this podcast.

Dr. Antonio Baines is an associate professor in the Department of Biology at North Carolina Central University, an adjunct professor in the Department of Pharmacology in the School of Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a cancer researcher.

PancreasClick to Enlarge Image

Dr. Baines’ research focuses on understanding a gene called Ras, and its role as a molecular target in pancreatic cancer. His research aim is to target certain points in the pathway of pancreatic cancer in order to increase the effectiveness of treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation. Dr. Baines goes into more depth about how his research could increase understanding of how to combat pancreatic cancer.



Direct link to video on YouTube: http://youtu.be/L-4r19YvX9o

View his entire Pizza Lunch Podcast presentation.

Click here to view a list of Dr. Baines' publications.

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How You Can Better Communicate Your Science

Download the MP3 audio file for this podcast.

Most scientists will tell you that one of the inspirations for their work is to somehow benefit mankind, whether that’s through new medicines or a better understanding of the formation of the universe. But how can scientists ensure that mankind knows about their work? 

Science Conference Example

Effective communication about science to the public has been the life work of science author and journalist  Dennis Meredith, whose career as a science communicator has included service at some of the country's leading research universities, including MIT, Cal tech, Cornell, Duke and the University of Wisconsin. In 2012, Meredith was inducted as an Honorary Life Member of Sigma Xi, and he is the Chair for American Scientist 's Committee on Communications and Publications. 

He wrote Explaining Research, which equips scientists and engineers with the necessary tools and techniques on explaining their work to various types of audiences.

In this podcast, he discussed with American Scientist managing editor, Fenella Saunders, some of the ways he’s found to help scientists become more effective communicators.

Podcast music is “Spot,” by Ardent Octopus, courtesy of Mevio’s Music Alley.

Funding for Pizza Lunches is provided by the North Carolina Biotechnology Center.

See our complete list of Pizza Lunch Podcasts

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Robots in Clinical and Home Environments

Download the MP3 audio file for this podcast.

Dr. Ron Alterovitz, an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, talks about current and future research and challenges involving robots used in clinical and home environments. LungFlexibleRobot

Dr. Alterovitz and his team apply algorithms to emerging robots that have the potential to enhance physician performance, improve patient care and autonomously assist people in their homes. An example involves medical devices like steerable needles and flexible tentacle-like robots that can assist surgeons reach their clinical target. In the home, robots are programmed to assist the elderly and people with disabilities.


Watch this video created by Dr. Alterovitz and Gu Ye at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill:

 

In this podcast, Dr. Alterovitz talks about his research on creating algorithms for robots and their use mainly in surgical and home environments.

Podcast music is “Spot,” by Ardent Octopus, courtesy of Mevio’s Music Alley.

Funding for Pizza Lunches is provided by the North Carolina Biotechnology Center.

See our complete list of Pizza Lunch Podcasts.

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Rolling the Dice on Big Data

Download the MP3 audio file for this podcast.

Dr. Ilse Ipsen, a professor in the Department of Mathematics at North Carolina State University, goes in-depth about how mathematicians can use the Monte Carlo method, and other tools, to wrestle with the deluge of data emerging from the wide variety of scientific research areas.

Dr. Ipsen's research interests include numerical linear algebra, matrix theory, numerical analysis, randomized algorithms, and others. She has written countless papers and software regarding her research as well as on the Monte Carlo method and its use on big data. Also, Dr. Ipsen is the associate director for the Statistical and Applied Mathematical Institute (SAMSI). SAMSI focuses on forging a synthesis of statistical sciences and applied mathematical sciences with disciplinary science to tackle difficult, yet important data- and model-driven scientific challenges.

MathConceptClick to Enlarge Image

In this podcast, Dr. Ipsen speaks with associate editor, Katie Burke, about her research and viewpoints on using the Monte Carlo method and big data.

Podcast music is “Spot,” by Ardent Octopus, courtesy of Mevio’s Music Alley.

Funding for Pizza Lunches is provided by the North Carolina Biotechnology Center.

See our complete list of Pizza Lunch Podcasts.

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Addressing Emergent Challenges with Wind Power

Download the MP3 audio file for this podcast.

Dr. Sukanta Basu , an associate professor in the Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at North Carolina State University, talks about the benefits and challenges of wind power and what it could mean for the future of renewable energy. His field of study is boundary layer meteorology , which addresses some of the widespread uses of wind power.

Wind turbines

Dr. Basu and his group research various boundary layer turbulence and practical problems using a combination of innovative approaches, such as state-of-the-art numerical simulations, field measurements, flow-visualizations and theoretical developments.

Podcast music is “Spot,” by Ardent Octopus, courtesy of Mevio’s Music Alley .

Funding for Pizza Lunches is provided by the North Carolina Biotechnology Center .

See our complete list of Pizza Lunch Podcasts.

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What Is Intelligence?

Katie L. Burke

Download the MP3 audio file for this podcast.

Brian Hare, professor of evolutionary anthropology and member of the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience at Duke University, is interested in what dogs can do cognitively that humans and other primates cannot do. Are humans really the most intelligent species? Hare compares psychology within primates as well as between primates and nonprimates through the Hominoid Psychology Research Group and the citizen science project that he launched, Dognition. You can find out how your dog's breed compares in intelligence measures with other dog breeds, based on Hare's research, by visiting Dognition's new data visualizations.

In this audio slideshow, Hare spoke to associate editor Katie L. Burke about what we can learn about our own species by studying dogs and bonobos.

Hare spoke at Sigma Xi Headquarters in March 2013.

Funding for Pizza Lunches is provided by the North Carolina Biotechnology Center.

See our complete list of Pizza Lunch Podcasts.

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Mystery of Big Data's Parallel Universe Brings Fear, and a Thrill

from the New York Times (Registration Required)

Not long ago, a woman in Tacoma, Wash., received a suggestion from Facebook that she "friend" another woman. She didn't know the other woman, but she followed through, as many of us have, innocently laying our cookie-crumb trails through cyberspace, only to get a surprise.

On the other woman's profile page was a wedding picture--of her and the first woman's husband, now exposed for all the cyberworld to see as a bigamist.

And so it goes in the era of what is called Big Data, in which more and more information about our lives--where we shop and what we buy, indeed where we are right now--the economy, the genomes of countless organisms we can't even name yet, galaxies full of stars we haven't counted, traffic jams in Singapore and the weather on Mars tumbles faster and faster through bigger and bigger computers down to everybody's fingertips, which are holding devices with more processing power than the Apollo mission control. Big Data probably knows more about us than we ourselves do, but is there stuff that Big Data itself doesn't know it knows? Big Data is watching us, but who or what is watching Big Data?

Read more...

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Total Records : 28


 

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