Subscribe
Subscribe
MY AMERICAN SCIENTIST
LOG IN! REGISTER!
SEARCH
 
Logo IMG
HOME > MULTIMEDIA > BROWSE MULTIMEDIA BY PUBLICATION TYPE

Science in the News Weekly


New! Sigma Xi SmartBrief

Science in the News has been replaced by Sigma Xi SmartBrief, an enhanced daily summary of science news.  You can follow it on the web here,  or subscribe here to receive free daily bulletins.

Save to Library

Building With Cross-Laminated Timber

Among the many apartment buildings in the London borough of Hackney, the nine-story structure on the corner of Provost Street and Murray Grove stands out, its exterior a mix of white and gray tiles rather than the usual brick. But it's what's underneath the tiles that makes the 29-unit building truly different. From the second floor up, it is constructed entirely of wood, making it one of the tallest wooden residential buildings in the world. ...

Save to Library

'Open Tree of Life' to Include All Known Species

Scientists are drawing a tree of life that includes every known species. A tree with about two million branches. "I think it is an amazing step forward for our community if it can be pulled off," said Robert P. Guralnick, an expert on evolutionary trees at the University of Colorado, who is not part of the project. ...

Save to Library

NASA May Inherit Ex-Spy Telescope

Working with a small band of astronomers for the past couple of months, NASA has come up with a plan to re-purpose an ex-spy telescope that had been declared surplus by another U.S. agency. ...

Save to Library

A Mammoth Find in Iowa

A nearly complete mammoth skeleton has been found buried on an Iowa farm about 60 miles southwest of Des Moines. The bones were largely undisturbed, which has allowed scientists to gather evidence that could help show what the area was like more than 12,000 years ago, when the animal died. ...

Save to Library

Science at the Top of the News for June 4-8

A study of Amelia Earhart's last radio transmissions before her disappearance was the most-viewed item last week by subscribers to Science in the News Daily. Other popular stories focused on the Creationism Museum in Petersburg, Kentucky, and a New York Times Magazine assessment of "32 Innovations That Will Change Your Tomorrow." Subscribe for free daily updates.

Save to Library

Fewer Bacteria Found in Women's Offices

Men's offices have 10 to 20 percent more bacteria than women's offices, and offices in New York City house more bacteria than those in San Francisco. These are among the findings of a new study that looked at bacteria in more than 90 offices in three cities--San Francisco, New York and Tucson--on chairs, desktops, phones, computer mice and keyboards. ...

Save to Library

Zookeepers Pressed to Decide Which Species to Save

Zoos are having to make tough choices about which endangered animals to try to save. The reality is that they can't save them all. ...

Save to Library

Facebook and Organ Donations

With demand for healthy organs for transplantation growing worldwide, Facebook has become a popular channel for people soliciting kidneys, livers and other potentially lifesaving organs. Earlier this month the social network began offering members the ability to identify themselves as organ donors on their Facebook pages and to locate state organ-donation registries if they would like to become donors. ...

Save to Library


Total Records : 1188


 

Connect With Us:

Facebook Icon Sm Twitter Icon Google+ Icon Pinterest Icon RSS Feed

Latest Multimedia

ANIMATION: Revealing the Logic Behind Candy Crush2014-11WalshF1.jpgClick to Enlarge Image

Candy Crush is turned into a model electrical circuit, which can be used to structure the equivalent of a logic puzzle. Besides justifying Candy Crush addictions, this information could be used to harness the player power of this game for bigger concerns, including computer security.
Watch the behind-the-scenes movements and how it is truly a logic puzzle.

To view all multimedia content, click "Latest Multimedia"!



RSS Feed Subscription

Receive notification when new content is posted from the entire website, or choose from the customized feeds available.


Subscribe to American Scientist