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Study Backs Simpler CPR for Patients

from the Wall Street Journal

People who suffered cardiac arrest and received chest compressions from bystanders had higher survival rates than those given standard resuscitation that included mouth-to-mouth breathing, a new study found.

About 300,000 people in the U.S. collapse each year from cardiac arrest, which can be brought on by a heart attack or other reasons, and fewer than one-third get CPR from bystanders, according to American Heart Association estimates. The breathing part of CPR is a big barrier for many people, the AHA says.

Growing evidence has suggested that skipping the mouth-to-mouth breathing in favor of rapid, chest-only compressions is as effective and easier for non-medical personnel to administer. The latest research, published in the Journal of American Medical Association, showed that chest-only compressions can be more effective than traditional CPR.

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