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SCIENCE IN THE NEWS DAILY

Sleepy Port of Dunwich Is about to Yield Its Secrets

from the Times (London)

As a great port on the East of England, Dunwich was nothing short of a medieval metropolis. Eight churches, eighty ships, five religious orders - including the Benedictines, Dominicans and Franciscans - and prosperity to rival London from its trade in wool, grain, fish and furs.

Such was the city's prestige that, under Edward I, it was granted two seats in Parliament.

But that was before Dunwich was swallowed by the sea. [Last week], more than five centuries after the last of a succession of storms and sea surges battered the Suffolk city into little more than a village, a research team will set sail to discover the secrets of a British Atlantis.

Using the latest acoustic imaging technology ... the researchers hope to reveal Dunwich in its prime.

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