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Landmark Alzheimer's Summit Launches Monday

from USA Today

A push to find new treatments and preventions for Alzheimer's disease begins today at the largest-ever government-sponsored summit for the disease, bringing together nearly 600 researchers from around the world.

And new treatments are long overdue, says Neil Buckholtz, chief of the Dementias of Aging Branch at the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md. The last drug therapy designed to ease symptoms of the brain-wasting illness was developed in 2003. Buckholtz drew up the agenda for the two-day NIA meetings.

"Not much has worked so far," Buckholtz says. "This is a major public health problem that is going to get worse over time, and we have to do a better job of developing trials and treatments."

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