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Lack of Vitamin D Rampant in Infants, Teens

from USA Today

Giving your children all they need to grow big and strong may not be as simple as a gummy vitamin and three square meals. They still may be susceptible to an epidemic that's starting to gain the notice of pediatricians and bone doctors across the country: vitamin D deficiency.

Mike Stone joined a growing legion of children diagnosed with the condition when an X-ray of his 14-year-old bones revealed a skeleton so thin it appeared clear on film.

... Stone was seriously vitamin D deficient, and though he had felt a "snap" in his back—the impetus for the doctor's visit—he had no fractures. But his bones had become perilously thin, 50 percent less dense than they should have been. His doctor immediately put him on vitamin D supplements to correct the problem, Stone says.

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