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SCIENCE IN THE NEWS DAILY

It's a Small, Small, Small, Small World

from the Scientific American

Scientific American presents a slide show of this year's 20 winning pictures from the Nikon Small World contest, along with captions describing what you're seeing and how the image was obtained.

The judges' task was to sit in a dimly lit room and try to rank the hundreds of entries—images taken by professional and amateur scientists around the world using visible-light microscopes.

... There were lots of diatoms—tiny single-celled algae—sometimes painstakingly arranged to look like common objects. There were also lots of insects, and some brain scans. But there were also rocks and other man-made items that had never been "alive."

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