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Hunt for Source of Salmonella-Tainted Tomatoes Continues

from the Los Angeles Times (Registration Required)

As the search for the source of salmonella-tainted tomatoes dragged on, federal officials announced several more cases of infection Monday.

The rare Salmonella Saintpaul strain has now caused 277 reported infections in 28 states and Washington, D.C., since mid-April and has led to at least 43 hospitalizations, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.

The Food and Drug Administration eliminated New Mexico, Indiana and Baja California as the origin of the outbreak Saturday and cleared Connecticut and Washington, D.C., late Monday. So far, the FDA has excluded 38 states, including California, and declared tomatoes grown in those regions to be safe to eat.

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