Subscribe
Subscribe
MY AMERICAN SCIENTIST
LOG IN! REGISTER!
SEARCH
 
Logo IMG
HOME > MULTIMEDIA > Multimedia Detail

SCIENCE IN THE NEWS DAILY

How Has Stephen Hawking Lived to 70 With ALS?

from Scientific American

Stephen Hawking turns 70 on Sunday, beating the odds of a daunting diagnosis by nearly half a century.

The famous theoretical physicist has helped to bring his ideas about black holes and quantum gravity to a broad public audience. For much of his time in the public eye, though, he has been confined to a wheelchair by a form of the motor-neuron disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). And since 1985 he has had to speak through his trademark computer system--which he operates with his cheek--and have around-the-clock care.

But his disease seems hardly to have slowed him down. Hawking spent 30 years as a full professor of mathematics at the University of Cambridge. And he is currently the director of research at the school's Center for Theoretical Cosmology. But like his mind, Hawking's illness seems to be singular. Most patients with ALS--also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, for the famous baseball player who succumbed to the disease--are diagnosed after the age of 50 and die within five years of their diagnosis. Hawking's condition was first diagnosed when he was 21, and he was not expected to see his 25th birthday.

Read more...


comments powered by Disqus
 

Connect With Us:

                   

Latest Multimedia

Audio: Using Computing to Advance Toxicology

Chemicals have changed our lives, providing new products and capabilities, but sometimes causing harm to ourselves and the environment... (click the link above to read more).

To view all multimedia content, click "Latest Multimedia."


RSS Feed Subscription

Receive notification when new content is posted from the entire website, or choose from the customized feeds available.


EMAIL TO A FRIEND :

Subscribe to American Scientist