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GPS Gadgets Can Reveal More Than Your Location

from New Scientist

We know GPS gadgets can tell where you are. But researchers at Microsoft are developing ways for them to know what you are doing too -- even down to which mode of transport you use to get to work.

The researchers say such new uses of the technology could help people analyse and improve their own lifestyles, and share useful data with others.

Phones and other gadgets with GPS capabilities built in are becoming ubiquitous. But they are typically used for little more than revealing a person's current whereabouts on a map.

Location data is beginning to find other applications -- for example to "geotag" photos with a location. But the Microsoft researchers think the power of GPS technology could be put to more intelligent and subtle uses.

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