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Earthquakes and Ancient Humans on the Island of Crete

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Click to Enlarge ImageKarl Wegmann, a geologist at North Carolina State University, may change how people view earthquake risks in the eastern Mediterranean. His study of the geology and archeological record of the island of Crete convinces him that the risk of a very large earthquake is less likely than geologists had believed.

That research also spawned an unexpected collaboration. Wegmann helped date the age of stone tools on Crete, artifacts that suggest that we Homo sapiens were not the first of our lineage to build or use boats.

In this podcast, Wegmann speaks with senior editor Cathy Clabby about his work studying the geology and prehistory of the beautiful island of Crete.

Wegmann spoke at Sigma Xi headquarters in February 2012.

Podcast music is “Spot,” by Ardent Octopus, courtesy of Mevio’s Music Alley.

Funding for Pizza Lunches is provided by the North Carolina Biotechnology Center.

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