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SCIENCE IN THE NEWS WEEKLY

A Step Toward Thought-Controlled Machines

In last week's issue of Nature, researchers reported a dramatic advance in brain-machine interface. Two monkeys with tiny sensors implanted in their brains were able to control a mechanical arm with their thoughts. It suggests that brain-controlled prosthetics, if not yet practical, are at least technically feasible.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is planning to begin sending drone airplanes into hurricanes this season as part of a program to monitor the atmosphere. The data sent back should help forecasters predict the intensity of the storms.

Robot submarines turned up several artifacts on the sea floor off the coast of Rhode Island last week, including objects associated with the wreck of the HMS Cerberus, which was scuttled by its British captain during the American Revolution. The robots were designed to hunt for underwater mines.

At a science summit in New York, leading American scientists criticized the decline in federal support for science and lamented the nation's diminished role as a leader in research and technology. It was the opening event for the first World Science Festival.

And, finally, it was also announced last week at the science festival that seven men are the first winners of new science prizes established by philanthropist, businessman and physicist Fred Kavli. The Kavli Prizes are worth $1 million in the fields of astrophysics, nanoscience and neuroscience. They will be awarded every other year.


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PODCASTS: From Balloons to Space Stations: Studying Cosmic Rays

CREAM Inflating

Cosmic rays have mysterious qualities about them that scientists continue to research in order to better understand their origins and composition. Dr. Eun-Suk Seo, a professor of physics at the University of Maryland, and her colleagues, fly enormous balloons as large as a football stadium and a volume of 40-million-cubic feet for extended periods over Antarctica to study particles coming from cosmic rays before they break up in the atmosphere.

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