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SCIENCE IN THE NEWS DAILY

A Scientist's 20-Year Quest to Defeat Dengue Fever

from NPR

This summer, my big idea is to explore the big ideas of science. Instead of just reporting science as results--the stuff that's published in scientific journals and covered as news--I want to take you inside the world of science. I hope I'll make it easier to understand how science works, and just how cool the process of discovery and innovation really is.

A lot of science involves failure, but there are also the brilliant successes, successes that can lead to new inventions, new tools, new drugs--things that can change the world

That got me thinking that I wanted to dive deeper into the story of an Australian scientist named Scott O'Neill. Scott had come up with what I thought was a clever new way for combating a disease called dengue fever. Dengue is a terrible disease. It sickens tens of millions and kills tens of thousands. There's no cure, no vaccine and pretty much no way to prevent it. It's one of those diseases transmitted by a mosquito, like malaria.

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