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Disputed Fossil Sold for $1 Million

An American auction house sold a fossil of a fearsome T. rex relative for $1 million despite a court order not to. The fossil was found in Mongolia, and the sale is contingent on the outcome of a court fight with the Mongolian government over ownership. ...

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Science at the Top of the News for May 21-25

An NPR story about an unusual sea creature caught on camera in the ocean off Great Britain was the most-viewed item last week by subscribers to Science in the News Daily. Other popular stories included the discovery of a mysterious sensory organ in a whale's chin and an examination by the L.A. Times on whether blazing a trail in solar energy has cost California too much. Subscribe for free daily updates.

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Benefits of 'Good' Cholesterol Questioned

A new study finds that "good" cholesterol might not boost your heart health as doctors once thought. The study looked at the genes of about 170,000 individuals, looking for variations in DNA that earlier research shows naturally raise HDL levels in those who possess them. After looking for these 15 genetic variations, the researchers discovered that none of these variations actually reduced the risks for having a heart attack. ...

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Luring Back the Swallows to San Juan Capistrano

A last-ditch effort is under way to lure back the cliff swallow, which put San Juan Capistrano on the map but has snubbed the mission in recent years. The mission has tried drawing them back with food. It has tried shelter. Now, it's trying seduction. ...

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Kepler Telescope Studies Superflares

The Kepler space telescope has provided fresh insight on the colossal explosions that can afflict some stars. These enormous releases of magnetic energy--known as superflares--could damage the atmosphere of a nearby orbiting planet, putting at risk any lifeforms that might reside there. ...

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Microbes Surpass Low Energy Limit for Life

Microbes have been discovered on the sea floor that have exceptionally low metabolic rates, using so little oxygen that they barely qualify as life. Researchers think that they may have been living at the absolute minimum energy requirement needed to subsist for 86 million years. ...

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Reif Elected President of MIT

Provost L. Rafael Reif was elected last week as president of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He will replace neuroscientist Susan Hockfield, who was the first life scientist to lead MIT, on July 2. ...

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