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Is That Fish Worth Chasing? A Seal's Whiskers Know

The waters of the North Sea are among the murkiest on the planet, so dark and silty that a seal sometimes can't see its own whiskers. Even so, the harbor seals there can hunt and catch fish. Marine biologists have known for several years that a seal relies on its whiskers to follow the wake a fish leaves behind. But according to a new study, whiskers supply detailed information that the seal may use to decide which fish are most worthwhile to hunt.

from ScienceNOW Daily News

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Volcanology: Europe's Ticking Time Bomb

It starts with a blast so strong that a column of ash and stone rockets 40 kilometres up into the stratosphere. The debris then drops to Earth, pelting the surface with boiling hot fragments of pumice and covering the ground with a thick layer of ash. Roofs crumble and vehicles grind to a halt. Yet the worst is still to come. Soon, avalanches of molten ash, pumice and gas roar down the slopes of the volcano, pulverizing buildings and burying everything in their path. Almost overnight, a packed metropolis becomes a volcanic wasteland.

from Nature News

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Theory of Recycled Universe Questioned

In November, cosmologists claimed to see echoes of violent collisions that happened before the Big Bang in the form of circular patterns in the early universe's relic radiation. But two new analyses of the same data, which are the first papers on the subject to be published in peer-reviewed journals, assert that those circles are nothing special.

from Wired Science

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Scientists Take Charles Darwin on the Road

"I want to send our scientists to rural schools and communities around the U.S. to talk about evolution for Darwin Day 2011." Jory Weintraub's words hung undigested in the silent air of the management meeting at our North Carolina center last July.

from Miller-McCune

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UNC Study Finds Way to Slow Spread of HIV

CHAPEL HILL -- A multinational study headed by a UNC-Chapel Hill researcher has led to a discovery that could help slow the spread of HIV...

from the (Raleigh, NC) News and Observer

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Setbacks at Japan Nuclear Plant

A reactor at Japan's crippled nuclear plant has been more badly damaged than originally thought, operator Tepco has said. Water is leaking from the pressure vessel surrounding reactor 1--probably because of damage caused by exposed fuel rods melting, a spokesman said...

from BBC News Online

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Scientists Identify Possible Human Lung Stem Cell

NEW YORK (Associated Press) -- Scientists believe they've discovered stem cells in the lung that can make a wide variety of the organ's tissues, a finding that might open new doors for treating emphysema and other diseases...

from the Boston Globe (Registration Required)

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Bedbugs With 'Superbug' Germ Found

(Associated Press) -- Hate insects? Afraid of germs? Researchers are reporting an alarming combination: bedbugs carrying a staph "superbug." Canadian scientists detected drug-resistant staph bacteria in bedbugs from three hospital patients from a downtrodden Vancouver neighborhood...

from the Seattle Times

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