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Clues to How Anesthesia Numbs the Brain

Emery Brown knows how to take the sting out of surgery. As an anesthesiologist, he has steered hundreds of patients to pain-free oblivion, allowing doctors to go about their business resetting bones, repairing heart valves or removing tumors. During surgery he continually monitors his patients, keeping tabs on their heart rate, blood pressure and breathing. Recently, he has also been eyeing what happens in their brains...

from Science News

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Superhuman Hearing Possible, Experiments Suggest

People may one day be able to hear what are now inaudible sounds, scientists say. New experiments suggest that just vibrating the ear bones could create shortcuts for sounds to enter the brain, thus boosting hearing...

from National Geographic News

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Bright Lights, Rich Cities

Fly into a city on a clear night and you'll enjoy a jeweled panorama below. Starkly lit skyscrapers, yellow glows from the windows of scattered homes, and roads pulsing white and red as cars speed over highways and crawl along residential streets. All of this electricity usage tends to indicate that a city has money to spend. And, indeed, in a new study, economists have shown that satellite measurements of an area's lights reveal how economically developed it is...

from ScienceNOW Daily News

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Massive Chilean Dams Approved

Officials in Chile have approved a controversial US$3.2-billion project to construct five hydropower dams in Patagonia. The HidroAysén project--a collaboration between the country's two biggest energy firms--plans to generate 2,750 megawatts of power by damming two major rivers, the Baker and the Pascua. But it must first seek approval for a 2,300-kilometre transmission line, costing another US$3.8 billion, that would carry power to Santiago...

from Nature News

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New Study Dramatically Cuts Treatment for Latent TB

Treating latent tuberculosis normally requires nine months of daily pill-taking, but a new study shows that a far shorter course of medication, with once-a-week drugs, works just as well...

from the Washington Post (Registration Required)

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Climate Study Gets Pulled After Charges of Plagiarism

Evidence of plagiarism and complaints about the peer-review process have led a statistics journal to retract a federally funded study that condemned scientific support for global warming...

from USA Today

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Wikileaks Cables Show Race to Carve Up Arctic

Secret US embassy cables released by Wikileaks show nations are racing to "carve up" Arctic resources--oil, gas and even rubies--as the ice retreats. They suggest that Arctic states, including the US and Russia, are all pushing to stake a claim. The opportunity to exploit resources has come because of a dramatic fall in the amount of ice in the Arctic...

from BBC News Online

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Inflation and Economic Hooliganism

In a way, I miss the months that followed Lehman's failure. O.K., not really--but if it was a time of terror, it was also a time of clarity. The whole world was going to hell in a handbasket, and policy makers everywhere shared a common goal: stopping the plunge...

from the New York Times (Registration Required)

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Latest Multimedia

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VIDEO: From Biology to Military History: Patterns in Animal Weaponry

What are the parallels between an ancient war ship and a dung beetle? More than you would think, actually! Douglas J. Emlen, PhD, has a unique perspective on animal weaponry that looks at patterns in military history.

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