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Fungus Farmers Show Way to New Drugs

In a mutually beneficial symbiosis, leaf-cutting ants cultivate fungus gardens, providing both a safe home for the fungi and a food source for the ants. But this 50-million-year-old relationship also includes microbes that new research shows could help speed the quest to develop better antibiotics and biofuels. ...

from Nature News

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Bioscientists Focus on the New, Vast Potential of Epigenetics

Epigenetics represents one of the cutting edges of bioscience, offering the possibility of not just curing diseases like cancer and diabetes, but preventing them altogether. ...

from the San Diego Union-Tribune (Registration Required)

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Surge of College Students Pursuing 'Clean Energy' Careers

In what could be an encouraging sign of change in the long-standing shortage of Americans preparing for "clean energy" careers, the subject is suddenly hot on college campuses across the nation—a surge of interest largely stimulated by the specter of global warming. ...

from the Los Angeles Times (Registration Required)

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The Ogallala Aquifer: Saving a Vital U.S. Water Source

On America's high plains, crops in early summer stretch to the horizon: field after verdant field of corn, sorghum, soybeans, wheat and cotton. Framed by immense skies now blue, now scarlet-streaked, this 800-mile expanse of agriculture looks like it could go on forever. It can't. ...

from Scientific American

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Do Drugs Offer a Long-Term Benefit for Kids With ADHD?

A large study on the effectiveness of drug treatment for children with hyperactivity or attention-deficit disorder has renewed debate on the issue. Researchers who participated in the study disagree whether the evidence suggests that medications do little good beyond 24 months. ...

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Dyson a Devoted Dissenter on Global Warming

The New York Times profiled physicist Freeman Dyson of the Institute for Advanced Study, who has become a leading contrarian on the issue of climate change. He is well aware that "most consider me wrong about global warming." But that only increases his resistance. ...

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Ancient Plant Refuse, Ice-Age Anthrax, a Bosun Reconstructed

Researchers are learning a lot from the seeds of plants that ancient peoples left behind in their refuse. The Scientist looked at the growing field of paleoethnobotany, which got its first big boost in the 1960s when archaeologists realized that not all plant remains decay. ...

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Entanglement Both Boon and Bane in Quantum Computing

Spooky quantum entanglement, a mysterious link between separated particles of energy or matter, may present some problems in the development of high-speed quantum computers. Researchers reported in a paper that too much entanglement can break down the entire system. ...

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