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Controversial Computer Is at Least a Little Quantum Mechanical

If the experiment was meant to silence the critics, it didn't. Four years ago, an upstart tech company created a stir when it claimed to have built a quantum computer--a thing that, in principle, could solve problems ordinary computers can't. Physicists from D-Wave Systems in Burnaby, Canada, even put on a demonstration. But other researchers questioned whether there was anything quantum mechanical going on inside the device. Now, the D-Wave team has published data that they say prove quantum phenomena are at work within its chip. But even if that's true, others still doubt that, as D-Wave researchers claim, the chip can do quantum-mechanical computations.

from ScienceNOW Daily News

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Independent Study Faults Owner in W.Va. Coal Blast

BECKLEY, W.Va. (Associated Press) -- Massey Energy Co. recklessly ignored safety and allowed dangerous conditions to build inside a West Virginia mine until a blast last year killed 29 men in the deadliest U.S. coal accident since 1970, according to an independent report released Thursday...

from the Seattle Times

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A Blood Test Offers Clues to Longevity

Want to know how long you will live? Blood tests that seek to tell people their biological age--possibly offering a clue to their longevity or how healthy they will remain--are now going on sale...

from the New York Times (Registration Required)

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FDA to Pull Diabetes Drug Avandia From Pharmacy Shelves

(HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced that the controversial diabetes drug Avandia will no longer be sold at retail pharmacies beginning this November, due to the cardiovascular risks it poses to patients...

from U.S. News and World Report

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Protein Flaws Responsible for Complex Life, Study Says

Tiny structural errors in proteins may have been responsible for changes that sparked complex life, researchers say. A comparison of proteins across 36 modern species suggests that protein flaws called "dehydrons" may have made proteins less stable in water. This would have made them more adhesive and more likely to end up working together, building up complex function...

from BBC News Online

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Space Shuttle Carries Mini-Satellites into Orbit

When space shuttle Endeavour blasted off Monday morning it carried three tiny satellites--each the size of a postage stamp--along with it.

from the Los Angeles Times (Registration Required)

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In Japan Reactor Failings, Danger Signs for the U.S.

TOKYO -- Emergency vents that American officials have said would prevent devastating hydrogen explosions at nuclear plants in the United States were put to the test in Japan--and failed to work, according to experts and officials with the company that operates the crippled Fukushima Daiichi plant...

from the New York Times (Registration Required)

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EPA Delays Rule on Industrial Emissions

The Obama administration has decided to delay a rule that would cut emissions from power plants at major industrial facilities, the most recent in a series of decisions since the midterm election to postpone controversial environmental regulations and steer a more business-friendly course...

from the Los Angeles Times (Registration Required)

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