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The Case for Eating Insects

Crickets, dung beetles and giant ants may not be your idea of an ideal meal, but millions of people around the world rely on insects for food. Crickets are so popular in Thailand that people farm the critters. Big-bottomed ants are a delicacy in Colombia.

from PRI's The World Science

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Suspect Bacterium May Trigger Parkinson's

NEW ORLEANS -- Brain cells may be the latest victim of a bacterial bad guy already charged with causing ulcers and stomach cancer.

from Science News

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Atom-Smasher Retires; Lab Makes Career Switch

When scientists at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory announced last month that they might have discovered a new elementary particle or fundamental force of nature, it was likely the swan song of the lab's Tevatron accelerator, once the most powerful atom-smasher in the world.

from the New York Times (Registration Required)

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Mammals' Big Brains Began With a Sniff

While dinosaurs ruled the world some 200 million years ago, a group of nocturnal, shrewlike proto-mammals unwittingly sniffed out a strategy for survival that eventually led to the evolution of larger brains. Fossil skulls of two ancient, mammal-like reptiles suggest that natural selection for a keener sense of smell was the initial spur behind bigger brains in early mammals, according to a report online today [May 19] in Science.

from ScienceNOW Daily News

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Alternative Medicine: Think Yourself Better

On May 29th Edzard Ernst, the world's first professor of complementary medicine, will step down after 18 years in his post at the Peninsula Medical School, in south-west England. Despite his job title (and the initial hopes of some purveyors of non-mainstream treatments), Dr. Ernst is no breathless promoter of snake oil. Instead, he and his research group have pioneered the rigorous study of everything from acupuncture and crystal healing to Reiki channelling and herbal remedies.

from the Economist

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Did Llama Dung Spur the Rise of Andean Civilization?

In 1610, a Jesuit priest journeyed through the high valleys of the central Andes, keenly observing the lives of the inhabitants. Father Bernabé Cobo was struck by the cold bleakness of the region and by the singular importance of llamas to its people. The indigenous inhabitants ate llama meat, bred them to carry goods, and used their wool and skin for clothing and shoes. These animals, Cobo later wrote, comprised "all the wealth of the mountain Indians."

from ScienceNOW Daily News

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Change the World, and Win Fabulous Prizes

The Internet is revitalizing an old stalwart in the innovation game: the prize as incentive.

from the New York Times (Registration Required)

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Rogue Waves Captured

Freak waves that swallow ships whole have been re-created in a tank of water. Though these tiny terrors are only centimeters high, a devilishly difficult mathematical equation describing their shape may help to explain the origins of massive rogue waves at sea.

from Science News

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Latest Multimedia

ANIMATION: Revealing the Logic Behind Candy Crush2014-11WalshF1.jpgClick to Enlarge Image

Candy Crush is turned into a model electrical circuit, which can be used to structure the equivalent of a logic puzzle. Besides justifying Candy Crush addictions, this information could be used to harness the player power of this game for bigger concerns, including computer security.
Watch the behind-the-scenes movements and how it is truly a logic puzzle.

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