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Longevity Tests Measure Telomere Length

Blood tests that offer clues to longevity are now going on sale. Some experts contend say the tests will not provide any useful information. ...

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Billions of Lonely Planets Wander the Galaxy

Astronomers say billions of "orphan" planets are wandering around the galaxy that have been ejected from the planetary systems that gave them birth and either were going their own lonely ways or were only distantly bound to stars at least 10 times as far away as the Sun is from the Earth. ...

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Antarctic Ozone Layer Bounces Back

Twenty-two years after the Montreal Protocol to ban chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and related ozone-destroying chemicals came into force, researchers in Australia say the ozone layer over Antarctica is starting to heal. ...

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Science at the Top of the News for May 16-20

The most-viewed item by subscribers to Science in the News Daily last week was an update on what went wrong at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Other top stories included research on how anesthesia numbs the brain and mysterious Morgellons disease. Subscribe now for free daily updates.

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New Treatment Lets Paralyzed Man Walk Again

A 25-year-old Los Angeles man paralyzed from the waist down after being hit by a car in 2006 has regained the ability to stand, take steps on a treadmill and move his hips, knees, ankles and toes voluntarily as a result of an experimental treatment developed at UCLA and the University of Louisville.

from the Los Angeles Times (Registration Required)

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Iceland Volcanic Ash Cloud Set to Reach UK

An ash cloud from the Grimsvotn volcano in Iceland is expected to reach the UK by the early hours of Tuesday morning, the Met Office has said.

from BBC News Online

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The Case for Eating Insects

Crickets, dung beetles and giant ants may not be your idea of an ideal meal, but millions of people around the world rely on insects for food. Crickets are so popular in Thailand that people farm the critters. Big-bottomed ants are a delicacy in Colombia.

from PRI's The World Science

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VIDEO: The Promise and Peril of Drones

CummingsDrones

The automation of tasks at work and at home is just around the corner, including driving cars, piloting planes, delivering packages, and transporting weapons. Unmanned aerial vehicles are rapidly evolving to meet both society’s and the military’s needs in automation and better efficiency.
During her time as one of the first female fighter pilots in the US Navy, Dr. Missy Cummings observed that computers could take off and land a plane more precisely than humans. Because of this breakthrough and her fascination with this growing technology, she began human–drone interaction research.

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