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The Tastiest Enemy: Eating Invasive Species

from Miller-McCune

Bristling with venomous spines and possessed of a voracious appetite, lionfish have joined a growing list of invasive species infiltrating U.S. land and water. But an unusual partnership of conservationists and cooks argue that some of the best weapons to attack these invaders are the knife and fork.

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Why Researchers Spend So Much Time Proving the Obvious

Medical researchers have unlocked the human genome, wiped out smallpox and made great strides in the fight against AIDS.

from the Los Angeles Times (Registration Required)

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E. coli Outbreak Kills 14 in Germany

A deadly form of E. coli bacteria, reportedly linked to Spanish cucumber exports, has killed at least 14 people in Germany and sickened hundreds more in what experts are saying is the one of the biggest outbreaks of the kind worldwide.

from Voice of America

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Global Carbon Emissions Reach Record

from BBC News Online

Energy-related carbon emissions reached a record level last year, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA).

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Conquistador Silver May Not Have Sunk Spain's Currency

Between 1520 and 1650, Spain's economy suffered crippling and unrelenting inflation in the so-called Price Revolution. Most historians have attributed that inflation, in part, to the importation, starting in 1550, of silver from the Americas, which supposedly put much more currency into circulation in Spain. But in a report out this week, a team of researchers argues that for more than a century the Spanish did not use this imported silver to make coins, suggesting that the amount of money circulating in Spain did not increase and could not have triggered the inflation.

from ScienceNOW Daily News

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Hawaii Heat Source Debated

from Science News

Like a pig at a luau, the Hawaiian Islands get roasted from below. But--like novice cooks--scientists aren't sure what kind of heat it takes to really get things cooking.

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After a Silent Spring, NASA Gives Up on Spirit

The Spirit is dead. NASA said on Tuesday that it was abandoning efforts to get back in touch with Spirit, one of the two rovers on Mars. Spirit, which has been stuck in a sand trap for two years, fell silent last year as winter arrived and its solar panels could no longer generate enough electricity. Engineers had hoped that the rover would revive when spring returned, but they never heard from it again...

from the New York Times (Registration Required)

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Explaining the Science of This Spring's Tornadoes

As residents of Joplin, Mo., continued digging out from Sunday's deadly tornado, researchers prepared to visit the stricken city to assess the storm's intensity. Coming only three weeks after an unprecedented series of twisters wrought destruction across the Southeast, many were wondering whether the events were related and whether more severe storms were in store. Here are answers to some questions about the science of tornadoes...

from the Los Angeles Times (Registration Required)

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