Subscribe
Subscribe
MY AMERICAN SCIENTIST
LOG IN! REGISTER!
SEARCH
 
Logo IMG
HOME > MULTIMEDIA

Conquistador Silver May Not Have Sunk Spain's Currency

Between 1520 and 1650, Spain's economy suffered crippling and unrelenting inflation in the so-called Price Revolution. Most historians have attributed that inflation, in part, to the importation, starting in 1550, of silver from the Americas, which supposedly put much more currency into circulation in Spain. But in a report out this week, a team of researchers argues that for more than a century the Spanish did not use this imported silver to make coins, suggesting that the amount of money circulating in Spain did not increase and could not have triggered the inflation.

from ScienceNOW Daily News

Read More

Save to Library

Hawaii Heat Source Debated

from Science News

Like a pig at a luau, the Hawaiian Islands get roasted from below. But--like novice cooks--scientists aren't sure what kind of heat it takes to really get things cooking.

Read More

Save to Library

After a Silent Spring, NASA Gives Up on Spirit

The Spirit is dead. NASA said on Tuesday that it was abandoning efforts to get back in touch with Spirit, one of the two rovers on Mars. Spirit, which has been stuck in a sand trap for two years, fell silent last year as winter arrived and its solar panels could no longer generate enough electricity. Engineers had hoped that the rover would revive when spring returned, but they never heard from it again...

from the New York Times (Registration Required)

Read More

Save to Library

Explaining the Science of This Spring's Tornadoes

As residents of Joplin, Mo., continued digging out from Sunday's deadly tornado, researchers prepared to visit the stricken city to assess the storm's intensity. Coming only three weeks after an unprecedented series of twisters wrought destruction across the Southeast, many were wondering whether the events were related and whether more severe storms were in store. Here are answers to some questions about the science of tornadoes...

from the Los Angeles Times (Registration Required)

Read More

Save to Library

Clues to Autism's Roots From Brain Study

Though autism and related disorders vary widely from person to person, certain brain changes may be at the root of the disorder.

from Science News

Read More

Save to Library

Cosmic Distance Record 'Broken'

A cataclysmic explosion of a huge star near the edge of the observable Universe may be the most distant single object yet spied by a telescope. Scientists believe the blast, which was detected by Nasa's Swift space observatory, occurred a mere 520 million years after the Big Bang. This means its light has taken a staggering 13.14 billion years to reach Earth...

from BBC News Online

Read More

Save to Library

Electrons Are Fantastically Round, Say British Scientists

After three months of experiments in a basement laboratory in London, scientists can confirm – with more confidence than ever – that the electron is very, very round.

from the Guardian (UK)

Read More

Save to Library

FDA Asked to Bar Antibiotics in Farm-Animal Food

Several environmental and public-health groups filed suit against the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Wednesday to try to force the government to stop farmers from routinely adding antibiotics to livestock feed to help animals grow faster...

from the Seattle Times

Read More

Save to Library




comments powered by Disqus
 

Connect With Us:

Facebook Icon Sm Twitter Icon Google+ Icon Pinterest Icon RSS Feed Instagram Icon

Latest Multimedia

Video: A Lone Gunman? Using Statistics in Forensics

Forensic scientists are often tasked to look for verification of what police officers already suspect, making bias a big problem.... (click the link above to read more).

To view all multimedia content, click "Latest Multimedia."



RSS Feed Subscription

Receive notification when new content is posted from the entire website, or choose from the customized feeds available.


Subscribe to American Scientist