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With No Labeling, Few Realize They Are Eating Genetically Modified Foods

When a team of activists wearing white hazmat suits showed up at a Chicago grocery store to protest the sale of genetically modified foods, they picked an unlikely target: Whole Foods Market...

from the Baltimore Sun

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Engineered Antibodies Cross Blood–Brain Barrier

By defying the classical rules of antibody engineering, researchers have constructed an antibody that is readily shuttled into the brain. The results suggest that the approach could be used to generate antibody-based therapies for brain diseases.

from Nature News

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Survey Captures Local Universe in 3-D

The cosmic backyard will never look the same, thanks to a new three-dimensional map — the most detailed view ever assembled out to a distance of 380 million light-years.

from Science News

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NASA Asteroid Mission Set for 2016

A NASA spacecraft has been approved to launch in 2016 to visit a near-Earth asteroid, mission managers announced today. Dubbed OSIRIS-REx—for Origins Spectral-Interpretation Resource-Identification Security Regolith Explorer—the robotic craft will conduct the first U.S. mission to collect pieces of an asteroid and bring them back to Earth...

from National Geographic News

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El Mirador, the Lost City of the Maya

Had we been traveling overland, it would have taken two or three days to get from the end of the road at Carmelita to El Mirador: long hours of punishing heat and drenching rain, of mud and mosquitoes, and the possibility that the jungle novice in our party (that would be me, not the biologists turned photographers Christian Ziegler and Claudio Contreras) might step on a lethal fer-de-lance or do some witless city thing to provoke a jaguar or arouse the ire of the army ants inhabiting the last great swath of subtropical rain forest in Mesoamerica.

from Smithsonian Magazine

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Robo-Jeeves Finds and Folds Your Crumpled Shirts

Simple as they seem, many routine domestic chores are still a big problem for robots. Fetching a beer from the fridge may be within a robot's grasp, but ask it to clear up a messy bedroom and it will be stumped. To a robot, a crumpled pair of trousers can look much like a discarded T-shirt, and it will struggle to tell a fluffy slipper from a sleeping cat.

from New Scientist

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Flies Alter Lice Evolution

How well lice are able to latch onto pigeon flies and catch a lift to new bird hosts affects how the lice evolve. Lice species carried aloft by flies spread to more species and tend to speciate at different times than their hosts, while ground-bound lice more closely coevolve with the birds they infect.

from the Scientist (Registration Required)


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Psst! The Human Brain Is Wired For Gossip

Hearing gossip about people can change the way you see them--literally. Negative gossip actually alters the way our visual system responds to a particular face, according to a study published online by the journal Science.

from NPR

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PODCAST & VIDEO: Engineering Around Extreme Events

Extreme events, such as super floods and hurricanes, are becoming more common, so civil engineers are trying to adapt civil infrastructure such as bridges to these unpredictable and sometimes devastating meteorological events. Engineer Ana Barros discusses how engineering can prepare us for extreme weather events, but also how changing climate and population conditions can affect the ability of infrastructure to hold up over time.

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