Subscribe
Subscribe
MY AMERICAN SCIENTIST
LOG IN! REGISTER!
SEARCH
 
Logo IMG
HOME > MULTIMEDIA

Robot Probes Great Pyramid

They might be ancient graffiti tags left by a worker or symbols of religious significance. A robot has sent back the first images of markings on the wall of a tiny chamber in the Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt that have not been seen for 4,500 years. It has also helped settle a controversy about the only metal known to exist in the pyramid, and its images show what might be a door leading to another hidden chamber.

from the Washington Post (Registration Required)

Read More

Save to Library

Women Atop Their Fields Dissect the Scientific Life

Elena Aprile, Joy Hirsch, Mary-Claire King and Tal Rabin are members of a rare breed--women scientists at the top of their fields.

from the New York Times (Registration Required)

Read More

Save to Library

Irradiation Underused to Fight E. coli in Foods

(Associated Press) -- Zapping salad fixings with just a bit of radiation can kill dangerous E. coli and other bacteria--and food safety experts say Europe's massive outbreak shows wary consumers should give the long-approved step a chance.

from USA Today

Read More

Save to Library

No Decline in Sperm Counts After All, Danish Data Show

In the dystopian book and film Children of Men, human beings suddenly stop being able to have children. There's no real explanation given for the change--though there's talk of a precipitous decline in sperm count quality--but the loss of the ability to reproduce essentially robs humanity of its future, and leads to the utter collapse of society.

from Time

Read More

Save to Library

Waste Slime Turns Jellyfish Into Ecological Vampires

That waste is useful is one of the animal kingdom's cardinal principles. One creature's discards are another's dinner, and so continues the circle of life. But jellyfish, it would seem, bend the rule.

from Wired Science

Read More

Save to Library

Cow Methane Proof 'Is in the Pat'

Research suggests the amount of methane that ruminants such as cows produce is correlated to quantities of a molecule in their faeces called archaeol.

from BBC News Online

Read More

Save to Library

Brand New Telescope Captures Omega Nebula in All its Glory

A spectacular stellar nursery shines through the gas and dust clouds of the Omega Nebula 5,500 light years from Earth in the heart of the Milky Way.

from the Guardian (U.K.)

Read More

Save to Library

Hungarian Natural History Under Threat

Looking for a new home: 200 human mummies from the eighteenth century, the remains of rare European dinosaurs and 10 million other artefacts currently at the Hungarian Natural History Museum, which is facing eviction later this year. The Hungarian government plans to turn the historic Budapest building given to the museum after the fall of communism in 1989 into a university to train the military or the police.

from Nature News

Read More

Save to Library




comments powered by Disqus
 

Connect With Us:

Facebook Icon Sm Twitter Icon Google+ Icon Pinterest Icon RSS Feed Instagram Icon

Latest Multimedia

VIDEO: The Promise and Peril of Drones

CummingsDrones

The automation of tasks at work and at home is just around the corner, including driving cars, piloting planes, delivering packages, and transporting weapons. Unmanned aerial vehicles are rapidly evolving to meet both society’s and the military’s needs in automation and better efficiency.
During her time as one of the first female fighter pilots in the US Navy, Dr. Missy Cummings observed that computers could take off and land a plane more precisely than humans. Because of this breakthrough and her fascination with this growing technology, she began human–drone interaction research.

To view all multimedia content, click "Latest Multimedia."



RSS Feed Subscription

Receive notification when new content is posted from the entire website, or choose from the customized feeds available.


Subscribe to American Scientist