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U.S. Is Falling Behind in the Business of 'Green'

LEICESTER, England -- The Mark Group started hunting for a new untapped market when it realized that its core business--insulating old homes using innovative technology--would drop off in coming years. Based in this rust-belt city, the company had grown rapidly over the last decade largely because of generous and mandatory government subsidies for energy conservation that impelled the British to treat their homes.

from the New York Times (Registration Required)

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Japanese Astronaut to Grow Cucumbers in Space

(SPACE.com) -- Japanese astronaut Satoshi Furukawa may be leaving planet Earth behind for a months-long trip to the International Space Station this week, but he won't forget his veggies: Furukawa plans to grow cucumbers in space in the name of science.

from the Christian Science Monitor

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Whistle-Blower Claims His Accusations Cost Him His Job

After months of friction that culminated in his openly questioning the reproducibility of data published by his supervisor, a postdoc at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's zoology department was presented with three options. The department's chairman said he could wait to be fired, resign voluntarily or accept a "gracious exit strategy" that would give him time to prepare a paper for publication, if he dropped his "scientific misconduct issues."

from Nature News

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Robot Probes Great Pyramid

They might be ancient graffiti tags left by a worker or symbols of religious significance. A robot has sent back the first images of markings on the wall of a tiny chamber in the Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt that have not been seen for 4,500 years. It has also helped settle a controversy about the only metal known to exist in the pyramid, and its images show what might be a door leading to another hidden chamber.

from the Washington Post (Registration Required)

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Women Atop Their Fields Dissect the Scientific Life

Elena Aprile, Joy Hirsch, Mary-Claire King and Tal Rabin are members of a rare breed--women scientists at the top of their fields.

from the New York Times (Registration Required)

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Irradiation Underused to Fight E. coli in Foods

(Associated Press) -- Zapping salad fixings with just a bit of radiation can kill dangerous E. coli and other bacteria--and food safety experts say Europe's massive outbreak shows wary consumers should give the long-approved step a chance.

from USA Today

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No Decline in Sperm Counts After All, Danish Data Show

In the dystopian book and film Children of Men, human beings suddenly stop being able to have children. There's no real explanation given for the change--though there's talk of a precipitous decline in sperm count quality--but the loss of the ability to reproduce essentially robs humanity of its future, and leads to the utter collapse of society.

from Time

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Waste Slime Turns Jellyfish Into Ecological Vampires

That waste is useful is one of the animal kingdom's cardinal principles. One creature's discards are another's dinner, and so continues the circle of life. But jellyfish, it would seem, bend the rule.

from Wired Science

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PODCASTS: Expanding With the Cosmos

Using the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ATC), a 6.5-meter microwave collector in Chile, cosmologists are piecing together the early history of the known universe. In an exclusive American Scientist interview, Arthur Kosowsky—a member of the ATC team and a professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Pittsburgh—discusses how he is using ATC to reach back in time billions of years to search for gravitational waves that could verify inflation and reveal unprecedented details about how the cosmos was born.

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