Subscribe
Subscribe
MY AMERICAN SCIENTIST
LOG IN! REGISTER!
SEARCH
 
Logo IMG
HOME > MULTIMEDIA

Multimedia

Energy Industry Shapes Lessons in Public Schools

In the mountains of southwestern Virginia, Gequetta Bright Laney taught public high school students this spring about a subject of keen interest to the region's biggest employer: the economics of coal mining.

from the Washington Post (Registration Required)

Read More

Save to Library

Drones Are Ready for Takeoff

During a test flight last year off the Pacific coast of Latin America, an aerial drone launched from the USS McInerney relayed back to the ship video of an open skiff speeding across the water. The frigate's crew had long experience chasing drug smugglers, so they knew what they were seeing. The skiff was 20 miles ahead of the frigate and moving away as the sun went down. In the flight control room, operators instructed the drone to take up the chase.

from Smithsonian Magazine

Read More

Save to Library

Millions Fewer Girls Born Due to Nuclear Radiation?

Nuclear radiation from bomb tests and power plant accidents causes slightly more boys than girls to be born, a new study suggests. While effects were seen to be regional for incidents on the ground, like Chernobyl, atmospheric blasts were found to affect birth rates on a global scale.

from National Geographic News

Read More

Save to Library

Old Buildings Combine Sustainability, Preservation

Much to the consternation of developers and redevelopment agencies intent on demolishing historic buildings and constructing new ones, these days, in the name of going green, preservationists are making the case that "the greenest building is the one already built."

from Miller-McCune

Read More

Save to Library

Dark Earth: How Humans Enriched the Rainforests

To find it, you have to go digging in rainforests. And to the untrained eye, it does not seem special at all--just a thick layer of dark earth that would not look out of place in many gardens. But these fertile dark soils are in fact very special, because despite the lushness of tropical rainforests, the soils beneath them are usually very poor and thin. Even more surprising is where this dark soil comes from.

from New Scientist

Read More

Save to Library

Some Worrying Superbugs

Scientists in the U.K. discovered that a new strain of superbug, MRSA--or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus--may be jumping from cattle to humans. ...

Read More

Save to Library

Mayan Freeways, Spanish Silver, A Bronze Age Battle

Surrounding the Mayan capitol of El Mirador 2,000 years ago, freeways connected the cities of the first state-level society in the western hemisphere, consisting of 200,000 inhabitants ruled by the Mayan lords of the snake kingdom. ...

Read More

Save to Library

Water, Water Everywhere ...

Satellite-based gravity sensors are fundamentally changing the way hydrology is done, at least when it comes to gauging groundwater depletion. The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) uses data from twin satellites to measure Earth's gravity, which reveals groundwater table levels with unparalleled accuracy. ...

Read More

Save to Library




comments powered by Disqus
 
Subscribe to American Scientist