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Stopping a Migraine Before It Starts

A migraine is among the most debilitating conditions in medicine--a blinding, throbbing pain that typically lasts between four and 72 hours. There is no cure.

from the Wall Street Journal

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Military Camouflage: That Old Razzle Dazzle

In the Second World War, many Allied ships were painted with dark and light stripes, and other contrasting shapes, making them look a bit like zebra. The idea was to distort an enemy submarine commander's perception of the ship's size, shape, range, heading and speed, so as to make it harder to hit with the non-homing torpedoes of the period. These had to be pointed not at the target directly but, rather, at the place where the commander thought the target would be when the torpedo arrived.

from the Economist

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Male Birth Control Pill: Are We There Yet?

Preventing unwanted pregnancy is a shared responsibility between both sexes, but what if men had the same contraceptive options as women?

from Discovery News

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Egyptian Mummies Hold Clues of Ancient Air Pollution

Ancient Egyptians may have been exposed to air pollution way back when, according to new evidence of particulates in the lungs of 15 mummies, including noblemen and priests.

from Live Science

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Plant Origami Shows How Dead Things Can Move

By determining how a desert plant's seed pods unfurl when they get wet, biologists discovered new principles for designing materials that respond to their environments. Eventually, the insights may help engineers improve satellites or develop artificial muscles.

from Wired Science

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U.S. Is Falling Behind in the Business of 'Green'

LEICESTER, England -- The Mark Group started hunting for a new untapped market when it realized that its core business--insulating old homes using innovative technology--would drop off in coming years. Based in this rust-belt city, the company had grown rapidly over the last decade largely because of generous and mandatory government subsidies for energy conservation that impelled the British to treat their homes.

from the New York Times (Registration Required)

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Japanese Astronaut to Grow Cucumbers in Space

(SPACE.com) -- Japanese astronaut Satoshi Furukawa may be leaving planet Earth behind for a months-long trip to the International Space Station this week, but he won't forget his veggies: Furukawa plans to grow cucumbers in space in the name of science.

from the Christian Science Monitor

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Whistle-Blower Claims His Accusations Cost Him His Job

After months of friction that culminated in his openly questioning the reproducibility of data published by his supervisor, a postdoc at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's zoology department was presented with three options. The department's chairman said he could wait to be fired, resign voluntarily or accept a "gracious exit strategy" that would give him time to prepare a paper for publication, if he dropped his "scientific misconduct issues."

from Nature News

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PODCAST & VIDEO: Engineering Around Extreme Events

Extreme events, such as super floods and hurricanes, are becoming more common, so civil engineers are trying to adapt civil infrastructure such as bridges to these unpredictable and sometimes devastating meteorological events. Engineer Ana Barros discusses how engineering can prepare us for extreme weather events, but also how changing climate and population conditions can affect the ability of infrastructure to hold up over time.

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