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Voyager 1 Encounters the Unexpected

On its journey to the stars, the Voyager 1 spacecraft has hit an unexpected, knife's-edge region at the boundary between the solar system and interstellar space. In short, Voyager 1 is in a spot where the sun's winds have, in effect, stopped blowing.

from the Christian Science Monitor

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IPCC Asks Scientists to Assess Geo-Engineering Climate Solutions

Lighter-coloured crops, aerosols in the stratosphere and iron filings in the ocean are among the measures being considered by leading scientists for "geo-engineering" the Earth's climate, leaked documents from the UN climate science body show.

from the Guardian (U.K.)

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Fukushima Workers Tackle Highly Radioactive Water

Today [Wednesday], workers at the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan tested out a system that will start cleaning up an enormous volume of radioactive water there.

from NPR

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Forecast Predicts Biggest Gulf Dead Zone Ever

NEW ORLEANS (Associated Press) -- Scientists predict this year's "dead zone" of low-oxygen water in the northern Gulf of Mexico will be the largest in history-- about the size of Lake Erie--because of more runoff from the flooded Mississippi River valley.

from the Boston Globe (Registration Required)

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Neutrino Particle 'Flips to All Flavours'

An important breakthrough may be imminent in the study of neutrinos. The multinational T2K project in Japan says it has seen indications in its data that these elementary particles can flip to any of their three types.

from BBC News Online

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Ketamine's Antidepressant Effect Explained

The anesthetic ketamine works against depression by quickly boosting levels of a brain compound that has been linked to the condition, a new study in mice shows. The research may lead to highly effective and fast-acting antidepressants that provide relief within hours instead of weeks, scientists report online June 15 in Nature.

from Science News

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Tribal Wars: DNA Testing Divides American Indians

Blasted from arid, rocky land where rattlesnakes once thrived, the Chukchansi Gold Resort and Casino stands like a modern castle in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. Saturday night and the car park is heaving with gleaming pick-ups lured from the small towns of central California.

from New Scientist (Registration Required)

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Europe Braces for Serious Crop Losses and Blackouts

LONDON -- One of the driest spring seasons on record in northern Europe has sucked soils dry and sharply reduced river levels to the point that governments are starting to fear crop losses and France, in particular, is bracing for blackouts as its river-cooled nuclear power plants may be forced to shut down.

from Scientific American

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2015-08WyskMMClick to Enlarge Image

PODCAST & VIDEO: 3D Printing Replacement Body Parts

Regenerative medicine, a fledgling field with the aim of regrowing parts from a person’s own cells, is being amplified with 3D-printing technology, which can now use organic materials to create scaffolds that cells need to grow into their final forms. Richard Wysk, a professor of industrial and systems engineering at North Carolina State University, discusses the latest successes with this research, and the timeline for creating more complicated structures.

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