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Tribal Wars: DNA Testing Divides American Indians

Blasted from arid, rocky land where rattlesnakes once thrived, the Chukchansi Gold Resort and Casino stands like a modern castle in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. Saturday night and the car park is heaving with gleaming pick-ups lured from the small towns of central California.

from New Scientist (Registration Required)

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Europe Braces for Serious Crop Losses and Blackouts

LONDON -- One of the driest spring seasons on record in northern Europe has sucked soils dry and sharply reduced river levels to the point that governments are starting to fear crop losses and France, in particular, is bracing for blackouts as its river-cooled nuclear power plants may be forced to shut down.

from Scientific American

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Twisted Structure Preserved Dinosaur Proteins

Scientists have discovered how fragments of the protein collagen might have survived in fossilized dinosaur bones. The intertwining, rope-like structure of the molecule, a major component of bone, could have shielded parts of the protein from enzymes and the elements for tens of millions of years, they say.

from Nature News

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Amazon Sees Further Logging Murder

A rural worker has been shot dead in Brazil's Amazon--the sixth murder in a month in the region, amid conflicts over land and logging. The body of Obede Loyla Souza was found in dense forest close to his home in the northern state of Para.

from BBC News Online

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New Lupus Drug Gets Mixed Reactions From Patients, Experts

For Janice Fitzgibbon, this is the story of a miracle drug. Two years ago, when she came to the Arthritis Clinic of Northern Virginia to receive her first infusion of an experimental treatment for lupus, she had been in a fog of pain and fear for three years.

from the Washington Post (Registration Required)

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F.D.A. Unveils New Rules About Sunscreen Claims

WASHINGTON -- After 33 years of consideration, the Food and Drug Administration took steps on Tuesday to sort out the confusing world of sunscreens, with new rules that specify which lotions provide the best protection against the sun and ending claims that they are truly waterproof.

from the New York Times (Registration Required)

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Why Venezuela's Wealth of Energy Resources Can't Stop Blackouts

Oil-rich Venezuela is also home to huge natural gas reserves and massive hydroelectric dams. But for all that energy, Venezuela can't produce enough electricity to meet demand.

from PRI's The World

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Pop Songs Literally Get Stuck in Teens' Heads

Ever wonder why some songs are more popular than others? Director of Emory University's Center for Neuropolicy Gregory Berns and economics research specialist Sara Moore have discovered there's some science behind that phenomenon.

from Time

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PODCASTS: Expanding With the Cosmos

Using the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ATC), a 6.5-meter microwave collector in Chile, cosmologists are piecing together the early history of the known universe. In an exclusive American Scientist interview, Arthur Kosowsky—a member of the ATC team and a professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Pittsburgh—discusses how he is using ATC to reach back in time billions of years to search for gravitational waves that could verify inflation and reveal unprecedented details about how the cosmos was born.

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