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New Lupus Drug Gets Mixed Reactions From Patients, Experts

For Janice Fitzgibbon, this is the story of a miracle drug. Two years ago, when she came to the Arthritis Clinic of Northern Virginia to receive her first infusion of an experimental treatment for lupus, she had been in a fog of pain and fear for three years.

from the Washington Post (Registration Required)

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F.D.A. Unveils New Rules About Sunscreen Claims

WASHINGTON -- After 33 years of consideration, the Food and Drug Administration took steps on Tuesday to sort out the confusing world of sunscreens, with new rules that specify which lotions provide the best protection against the sun and ending claims that they are truly waterproof.

from the New York Times (Registration Required)

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Why Venezuela's Wealth of Energy Resources Can't Stop Blackouts

Oil-rich Venezuela is also home to huge natural gas reserves and massive hydroelectric dams. But for all that energy, Venezuela can't produce enough electricity to meet demand.

from PRI's The World

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Pop Songs Literally Get Stuck in Teens' Heads

Ever wonder why some songs are more popular than others? Director of Emory University's Center for Neuropolicy Gregory Berns and economics research specialist Sara Moore have discovered there's some science behind that phenomenon.

from Time

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Experts Warn of Turbulent Trip to Cloud Computing

When Steve Jobs walked onstage last week to introduce the iCloud, the feeling of anticipation was palpable. Apple's version of "the cloud," he said, would "demote the PC" and usher in the next big revolution.

from NPR

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Ancient Fossils Have Evolution's First Shells

A series of spectacularly preserved, 750 million-year-old fossils represent the microscopic origins of biomineralization, or the ability to convert minerals into hard, physical structures. This process is what makes bones, shells, teeth and hair possible, literally shaping the animal kingdom and even Earth itself.

from Wired Science

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Why Female Zebra Finches Cheat on Their Partner

Zebra finches form monogamous lifetime partnerships, but both males and females indulge in extramarital sex. The benefit for the males is clear: the chance to sire more offspring than fidelity would permit. But why would females cheat when that means risking losing their lifetime partners and catching diseases?

from New Scientist

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Memory Training Improves Intelligence in Some Children

from the Los Angeles Times (Registration Required)

Training a child to hold a whole cluster of items in his or her memory for even a short time may feel like trying to hold a wave on the sand. But a study published Monday says it's a drill that can yield lasting benefits.

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PODCASTS: From Balloons to Space Stations: Studying Cosmic Rays

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Cosmic rays have mysterious qualities about them that scientists continue to research in order to better understand their origins and composition. Dr. Eun-Suk Seo, a professor of physics at the University of Maryland, and her colleagues, fly enormous balloons as large as a football stadium and a volume of 40-million-cubic feet for extended periods over Antarctica to study particles coming from cosmic rays before they break up in the atmosphere.

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