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Forest Europe Summit 'To Shape' Policy

Forestry ministers from across Europe are attending a summit to shape future policy on how woodlands are managed. Delegates from 46 nations are expected to decide whether they will go ahead and establish a legally binding agreement on forest management.

from BBC News Online

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New Dino May Be World's Smallest

A new species of carnivorous non-avian dinosaur, described in the latest issue of Cretaceous Research, could be the world's smallest known dinosaur.

from Discovery News

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Giant Viruses

The common view of viruses, mostly true, is of tiny burglars that sneak into cells, grab the biosynthetic controls and compel the cell to make huge numbers of progeny that break out of the cell and keep the replication cycle going. Viruses are supposed to be diminutive even compared to cells that are just a micrometer (1,000 nanometers) in diameter. They are supposed to travel light, making do with just a few well-adapted genes.

from American Scientist

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Researchers Call for Nuclear Data Release

Shortly after a massive tsunami struck the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on 11 March, an unmanned monitoring station on the outskirts of Takasaki, Japan, logged a rise in radiation levels. Within 72 hours, scientists had analysed samples taken from the air and transmitted their analysis to Vienna, Austria--the headquarters of the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), an international body set up to monitor nuclear weapons tests.

from Nature News

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Human Mutation Rate Slower Than Thought

Bad news for fans of the X-Men: It may take longer to create a new class of mutant superhumans than previous estimates suggested. The first direct measurements of human mutation rates reveal that the speed at which successive generations accumulate single-letter genetic changes is much slower than previously thought.

from Science News

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Why Do Doctors Tell White Lies?

When I was a medical student, I worked with a doctor who lied. One day, she lied by ordering a kidney-stone CT scan on a patient she thought had appendicitis.

from Time

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Preparing for a Warming World

We could be in for more wild weather, courtesy of climate change. The 2010 heat wave in Russia killed an estimated 15,000 people. Floods in Australia and Pakistan killed 2,000 and left large swaths of each country under water. A months-long drought in China has devastated millions of acres of farmland. And the temperature keeps rising: 2010 was the hottest year on earth since weather records began. ...

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CERN Studies Trapped Antimatter

At the CERN particle collider in Geneva, physicists have created and trapped atoms of antihydrogen for more than a thousand seconds, it was announced last week. That's long enough for experiments that could help answer some of the most fundamental questions in physics. ...

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