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Drawn Together by the Casimir Effect

Fabrizio Pinto, Katie-Leigh Corder, Fenella Saunders

2014-07PintoFp283.jpgClick to Enlarge ImageHow and why does the Casimir effect take place? This animation interprets what happens to the electromagnetic field because of quantum effects and virtual photons, to show what results when two plates are brought close together in such an environment.

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Redesigning the Human Genome with DNA-Binding Proteins

Katie-Leigh Corder, Katie L. Burke

Gene therapy

Gene therapy and genomic engineering are rapidly burgeoning areas of research. Dr. Charles Gersbach of Duke University sat down with associate editor Katie L. Burke to discuss the history of gene therapy and what we can do now that we couldn’t do even a few years ago.

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Ultrafast Animals: Mantis Shrimp and Trap-Jaw Ants

Katie-Leigh Corder, Katie L. Burke

Mantis Shrimp

When people think of the fastest animals, most consider running cheetahs, flitting hummingbirds, or jumping kangaroos. But there's a level above what we think of as “fast”: Ultrafast organisms conserve energy and move in nano- or even micro-seconds.

TJ Ants

Dr. Sheila Patek discusses her research with two ultrafast creatures: mantis shrimp and trap-jaw ants.

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Chasing Down Cosmic Dust

Fenella Saunders, Katie-Leigh Corder

Cosmic Dust Image

The formation of tiny particles of pollutants in the atmosphere, raindrops in a cloud, and cosmic dust share common physics, closely related to a process called nucleation, the means by which molecules begin to form solids. The key unknown is the physics and behavior of nanoclusters that are far more complex than a single molecule, yet not big enough to be considered solids or liquids. Davide Lazzati discusses his research on cosmic dust and how additional findings can improve the current theory's performance and ability to predict the properties and formation of nanoparticles.

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Science Hangout: Why is Clownfish Behavior in Finding Nemo Misleading?

Katie L. Burke, Katie-Leigh Corder

ClownfishIn this Science Hangout, two animal behaviorists, Marian Wong of University of Wollongong in Australia and Peter Buston, PhD, of Boston University, explain to associate editor Katie Burke, PhD, that the clownfish behavior in the Disney-Pixar film Finding Nemo is completely off the mark.

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Uncovering the Complexity of Bartonellosis

Katie L. Burke

Click to Enlarge Image

There is little truth to the saying "what you don't know can't hurt you" when it comes to infection with bacteria in the genus Bartonella. Over two decades of research, veterinarian and professor of medicine Ed Breitschwerdt of North Carolina State University has shown that these bacteria can infect humans and other mammals, and in turn, cause a variety of perplexing symptoms.

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Retracing the Evolution of African Penguins

Katie-Leigh Corder, Fenella Saunders

African Penguins

"Penguins are 10 times older than humans and have been here for a very, very long time," said Daniel Ksepka, Ph.D., a researcher at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent). Dr. Ksepka researches the evolution of penguins and how they came to inhabit the African continent.

Because penguins have been around for over 60 million years, their fossil record is extensive. Fossils that Dr. Ksepka and his colleagues have discovered provide clues about migration patterns and the diversity of penguin species.

Dr. Ksepka goes into more depth about how his research is piecing together the evolutionary puzzle of penguins and other related bird species.

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Science Hangout: Dr. Gruss on Advancing Research

Katie-Leigh Corder, Fenella Saunders

Scientist researchIn American Scientist's first Google Hangout On Air, managing editor Fenella Saunders talks with Prof. Dr. Peter Gruss, president of the Max Planck Society, which is a nonprofit research organization that has promoted research at its own institutes since 1948.

He discusses the need to grow basic research, the pluses and minuses for using grants as the main source of support for researchers, the role of business funding in science, the importance of multidisciplinary collaborations, the need to support women in science careers, and the gains created by communicating science well to the general public.

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Latest Multimedia

ANIMATION: Revealing the Logic Behind Candy Crush2014-11WalshF1.jpgClick to Enlarge Image

Candy Crush is turned into a model electrical circuit, which can be used to structure the equivalent of a logic puzzle. Besides justifying Candy Crush addictions, this information could be used to harness the player power of this game for bigger concerns, including computer security.
Watch the behind-the-scenes movements and how it is truly a logic puzzle.

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