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Ancient Past: A New Meaning for Stonehenge?

British archaeologists said last week that Stonehenge, the prehistoric stone monument, appears to have served as a cemetery for as long as 500 years and may have been a burial site for a single important family, perhaps a royal dynasty.

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Giant 'Kitchen Towel' Could Be Used to Mop Up Oil Spills

Giant "kitchen towels" could replace booms, bombs and detergents as the best remedy for a catastrophic oil spill, researchers said after inventing a super-absorbent membrane. ...

from the Times (London)

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Erbitux OK for Colorectal Cancer Patients with Genetic Marker

A new study shows which colorectal cancer patients may benefit from a drug - and which would be better off without it. ...

from USA Today

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Oyster-Saving Efforts a Wash in Chesapeake

A vast government effort to bring oysters back to the Chesapeake Bay has turned out so dismally that it has the ring of a math-class riddle. How do you spend $58 million to get more of something and wind up with less of it?

from the Washington Post

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Shaky Start for New Quake Alert System in Japan

After late or missed warnings, operators are struggling to figure out why a recently launched earthquake early-alert system in Japan isn't working as planned. ...

from National Geographic News

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Girls Are Becoming as Good as Boys at Mathematics

Tradition has it that boys are good at counting and girls are good at reading. So much so that Mattel once produced a talking Barbie doll whose stock of phrases included "Math class is tough!" ...

from the Economist

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DNA Computer Puts Microbes to Work as Number Crunchers

It's not your normal, electronic silicon-based machine, but scientists have made a computer from a small, circular piece of DNA, then inserted it into a living bacterial cell and unleashed the microbe to solve a mathematical sorting problem. ...

from Scientific American

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The Media Monitor

Timothy Caulfield has spent years listening to scientists complain that the media does a poor job of explaining science. ... Finally, he decided to find out for himself. ...

from the Scientist

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PODCASTS: From Balloons to Space Stations: Studying Cosmic Rays

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Cosmic rays have mysterious qualities about them that scientists continue to research in order to better understand their origins and composition. Dr. Eun-Suk Seo, a professor of physics at the University of Maryland, and her colleagues, fly enormous balloons as large as a football stadium and a volume of 40-million-cubic feet for extended periods over Antarctica to study particles coming from cosmic rays before they break up in the atmosphere.

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