Subscribe
Subscribe
MY AMERICAN SCIENTIST
LOG IN! REGISTER!
SEARCH
 
Logo IMG
HOME > MULTIMEDIA

Multimedia

A Scientist's 20-Year Quest to Defeat Dengue Fever

This summer, my big idea is to explore the big ideas of science. Instead of just reporting science as results--the stuff that's published in scientific journals and covered as news--I want to take you inside the world of science. I hope I'll make it easier to understand how science works, and just how cool the process of discovery and innovation really is...

from NPR

Read More

Save to Library

Pluto's Moons Offer Hints of Alien Worlds

Planet or not, Pluto and its newest moons may tell us a lot about how other worlds orbit distant stars. A new computer simulation based on the motions of Pluto's satellites not only zeroes in on the masses of two of the moons but predicts that planets orbiting double stars are more widely spaced from one another than are the worlds of single stars such as the sun...

from ScienceNOW Daily News

Read More

Save to Library

Some Newfound Planets Are Something Else

When the Kepler spacecraft finds a giant planet closely orbiting a star, there's a one in three chance that it's not really a planet at all...

from Science News

Read More

Save to Library

"Time Capsule" Warship Emerging Near D.C.

A warship submerged for two centuries in a river near Washington, D.C., could provide new insight into the relatively obscure War of 1812, say archaeologists who are preparing to excavate the wreck...

from National Geographic News

Read More

Save to Library

32 Innovations That Will Change Your Tomorrow

We tend to rewrite the histories of technological innovation, making myths about a guy who had a great idea that changed the world. In reality, though, innovation isn't the goal; it's everything that gets you there. It's bad financial decisions and blueprints for machines that weren't built until decades later. It's the important leaps forward that synthesize lots of ideas, and it's the belly-up failures that teach us what not to do...

from the New York Times (Registration Required)

Read More

Save to Library

World's 'Oldest Fish Trap' Found Off Coast of Sweden

Wooden fish traps said to be some 9,000 years old have been found in the Baltic Sea off Sweden, possibly the oldest such traps in existence. Marine archaeologists from Stockholm's Sodertorn University found finger-thick hazel rods grouped on the sea bed...

from BBC News Online

Read More

Save to Library

Tree of Life Project Aims for Every Twig and Leaf

In 1837, Charles Darwin opened a notebook and drew a simple tree with a few branches. Each branch, which he labeled with a letter, represented a species. In that doodle, he captured his newfound realization that species were related, having evolved from a common ancestor. Across the top of the page he wrote, "I think."

from the New York Times (Registration Required)

Read More

Save to Library

Author Ray Bradbury Dies at 91

Ray Bradbury, the writer whose expansive flights of fantasy and vividly rendered space-scapes have provided the world with one of the most enduring speculative blueprints for the future, has died. He was 91...

from the Los Angeles Times (Registration Required)

Read More

Save to Library




comments powered by Disqus
 
Subscribe to American Scientist