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SCIENCE IN THE NEWS WEEKLY

Salp Shut Down California Nuclear Facility

Sea creatures called salp are clogging screens at the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant that are used to keep marine life out of the seawater used as a coolant. Officials have been forced to adjust operations at the facility.

In other technology news, chemists have devised a better method of coating fabrics with a water-repellent, "self-cleaning" coating. They engineered a multi-layered coating whose layers, when struck with UV light, bond more firmly to each other and to cotton.

The U.K. and U.S. will work together to develop "floating" wind turbines to harness more offshore wind power. In order to exploit the U.K.'s huge wind resource, new technology is needed to access waters between 60 and 100 meters deep: too deep for turbines fixed to the seabed, but where wind speeds are consistently higher.

In a new study, a specially designed fantasy video game helped teens conquer depression just as well as--if not better than--the usual counseling. Researchers in New Zealand created the SPARX video game as a way to deliver cognitive behavioral therapy, packaged in a fun and appealing way.


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2015-08WyskMMClick to Enlarge Image

PODCAST & VIDEO: 3D Printing Replacement Body Parts

Regenerative medicine, a fledgling field with the aim of regrowing parts from a person’s own cells, is being amplified with 3D-printing technology, which can now use organic materials to create scaffolds that cells need to grow into their final forms. Richard Wysk, a professor of industrial and systems engineering at North Carolina State University, discusses the latest successes with this research, and the timeline for creating more complicated structures.

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