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SCIENCE IN THE NEWS WEEKLY

Salp Shut Down California Nuclear Facility

Sea creatures called salp are clogging screens at the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant that are used to keep marine life out of the seawater used as a coolant. Officials have been forced to adjust operations at the facility.

In other technology news, chemists have devised a better method of coating fabrics with a water-repellent, "self-cleaning" coating. They engineered a multi-layered coating whose layers, when struck with UV light, bond more firmly to each other and to cotton.

The U.K. and U.S. will work together to develop "floating" wind turbines to harness more offshore wind power. In order to exploit the U.K.'s huge wind resource, new technology is needed to access waters between 60 and 100 meters deep: too deep for turbines fixed to the seabed, but where wind speeds are consistently higher.

In a new study, a specially designed fantasy video game helped teens conquer depression just as well as--if not better than--the usual counseling. Researchers in New Zealand created the SPARX video game as a way to deliver cognitive behavioral therapy, packaged in a fun and appealing way.


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PODCASTS: From Balloons to Space Stations: Studying Cosmic Rays

CREAM Inflating

Cosmic rays have mysterious qualities about them that scientists continue to research in order to better understand their origins and composition. Dr. Eun-Suk Seo, a professor of physics at the University of Maryland, and her colleagues, fly enormous balloons as large as a football stadium and a volume of 40-million-cubic feet for extended periods over Antarctica to study particles coming from cosmic rays before they break up in the atmosphere.

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