MY AMERICAN SCIENTIST
LOG IN! REGISTER!
SEARCH
 
RSS
Logo IMG
HOME > My Amsci > Restricted Access

Solving Polynomials with Computers



Restricted Access The content you've requested is available without charge only to active Sigma Xi members and American Scientist subscribers.


If you are an active member or an individual subscriber, please log in now in order to access this article.

If you are not a member or individual subscriber, you can:



Abstract:

Figure 3. Most people can touch certain spotsClick to Enlarge Image

In order to teach robots how to move and computers how to see, mathematicians have to reconsider one of their most ancient challenges: how to find the zeroes (or "roots") of a polynomial. The computer has re-invigorated the field by enabling mathematicians to use approximate methods, zeroeing in on the zeroes with high speed and precision. New algorithms developed by the author and colleagues make it possible, in principle, to solve a polynomial equation almost as fast as it can be written down.


Subscribe to American Scientist