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HOME > PAST ISSUE > May-June 2003 > Article Detail

COMPUTING SCIENCE

The Post-OOP Paradigm

Brian Hayes

Every generation has to reinvent the practice of computer programming. In the 1950s the key innovations were programming languages such as Fortran and Lisp. The 1960s and '70s saw a crusade to root out "spaghetti code" and replace it with "structured programming." Since the 1980s software development has been dominated by a methodology known as object-oriented programming, or OOP. Now there are signs that OOP may be running out of oomph, and discontented programmers are once again casting about for the next big idea. It's time to look at what might await us in the post-OOP era (apart from an unfortunate acronym).








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