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On the Cover

January-February 2010 Volume 98, Number 1

More than a hundred exposures taken by the Phoenix lander’s surface stereo imager camera were combined and projected as if the viewer is looking down from above to create this remarkably clear image of the spacecraft millions of miles away on the surface of Mars. ...


FEATURE ARTICLES

Assessing Risks from Bisphenol-A

Heather Patisaul

Evaluating human health risks from endocrine disruptors such as BPA is difficult, but animal studies suggest trouble is afoot


Phoenix on Mars

Walter Goetz

The latest successful landing craft has made new discoveries about water on the red planet


Neural Interfaces *

Warren Grill

Communicating with the nervous system through implanted devices requires engineering solutions to biomedical problems


Carbon Dioxide and the Climate

Gilbert N. Plass, James Rodger Fleming, Gavin Schmidt

A 1956 American Scientist article explores climate change; two contemporary commentaries illuminate its relevance to the present


* access restricted to members and subscribers


SCIENTISTS’ BOOKSHELF

Never a Dull Number

Brian Hayes

A review of Those Fascinating Numbers, by Jean-Marie De Koninck. What makes a number interesting?

See all book reviews for this issue.


DEPARTMENTS

MACROSCOPE

A Short History of Hydrogen Sulfide

From the sewers of Paris to physiological messenger

Roger P. Smith

COMPUTING SCIENCE

A Tisket, a Tasket, an Appollonian Gasket

Fractals made of circles do funny things to mathematicians

Dana Mackenzie

ENGINEERING

Occasional Design*

An everyday challenge provides lessons in the processes of planning and execution

Henry Petroski

MARGINALIA

You'll Never Guess Who Walked In!

Ardi redefines the branch between apes and hominins

Pat Shipman

SIGHTINGS

Real-Deal Connectivity

New levels of detail in neural networks are being revealed

Catherine Clabby

SCIENCE OBSERVER

A Magic Number?

An Australian team says it has figured out the minimum viable population for mammals, reptiles, birds, plants and the rest

Catherine Clabby

That Sinking Feeling

Dense development can complicate projections of land subsidence in coastal regions

Catherine Clabby

In the News

LETTERS TO THE EDITORS

In Defense of R. A. Fisher

Don't Forget the Scale

A Little Context, Please

SIGMA XI TODAY (PDF)


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