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On the Cover

July-August 2009 Volume 97, Number 4

Effervescence defines Champagne and sparkling wines. Elegant bubble trains rise from nucleation sites—microscopic cellulose fibers—deposited on the glass. ...


FEATURE ARTICLES

Bubbles and Flow Patterns in Champagne

Guillaume Polidori, Philippe Jeandet, Gérard Liger-Belair

Is the fizz just for show, or does it add to the taste of sparkling wines?


Human History Written in Stone and Blood

Zenobia Jacobs, Richard G. Roberts

Two bursts of human innovation in southern Africa during the Middle Stone Age may be linked to population growth and early migration off the continent


Of Beauty, Sex and Power *

Andrew Gelman, David Weakliem

Too little attention has been paid to the statistical challenges in estimating small effects


Proteomimicry *

Jerry H. Brown

Engineering inspiration arises from the structures of proteins


* access restricted to members and subscribers


SCIENTISTS’ BOOKSHELF

Outsourcing the Mind

Dan Lloyd

A review of Supersizing the Mind: Embodiment, Action, and Cognitive Extension, by Andy Clark, and Out of Our Heads: Why You Are Not Your Brain, and Other Lessons from the Biology of Consciousness, by Alva Noë. Are the mechanisms of mind all in the head? These authors think not

See all book reviews for this issue.


DEPARTMENTS

MACROSCOPE

That's Funny ...

A window on data can be a window on discovery

Howard Wainer and Shaun Lysen

COMPUTING SCIENCE

The Best Bits

A new technology called compressive sensing slims down data at the source

Brian Hayes

ENGINEERING

Once an Engineer ...*

Alexander Calder turned statics and dynamics into stabiles and mobiles

Henry Petroski

MARGINALIA

The Woof at the Door

Dogs may have been man's best friend for thousands of years longer than we realized

Pat Shipman

SIGHTINGS

Follow the Flow

Modeling air flows through Manhattan

Catherine Clabby

SCIENCE OBSERVER

Rip Van Winkle Ecology

Biologists awaken dormant eggs to observe life from the past and tease out how it differs from what lives today

Catherine Clabby

Working Best Under Pressure

A new type of polymer turns mechanical forces into chemical reactions

Fenella Saunders

Science Art Found

The Art of Science show turns up turbulence, silicon, squid and more

Anna Lena Phillips

In the News

LETTERS TO THE EDITORS

Celebration or Exploitation?

Fantasy Is Reality

Real or Imagined Limits?

SIGMA XI TODAY (PDF)


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