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On the Cover

September-October 2008 Volume 96, Number 5

The past half-century has witnessed incredible advances in the capabilities of satellites, leading to unprecedented insights into our planet. As Andy J. Tatem, Scott J. Goetz and Simon I. Hay report in "Fifty Years of Earth-observation Satellites," these devices, now numbering more than 150, are essential for monitoring events both natural and influenced by human activities, such as the El Nino Southern Oscillation. ...


FEATURE ARTICLES

Evolution "for the Good of the Group" *

David Sloan Wilson, Edward O. Wilson

The process known as group selection was once accepted unthinkingly, then was widely discredited; it's time for a more discriminating assessment


Fifty Years of Earth-observation Satellites *

Andrew J. Tatem, Scott J. Goetz, Simon I. Hay

Views from space have led to countless advances on the ground in both scientific knowledge and daily life


Water News: Bad, Good and Virtual *

Vaclav Smil

Rational thinking about water may be key to ensuring a clean, plentiful supply


Statins: From Fungus to Pharma

Philip A. Rea

The curiosity of biochemists, mixed with some obvious economic incentives, created a family of powerful cardiovascular drugs


* access restricted to members and subscribers


SCIENTISTS’ BOOKSHELF

The Organisms that Made It All Possible

Audra J. Wolfe

A review of A Guinea Pig's History of Biology, by Jim Endersby. Endersby proposes giving equal time to scientists, their objects of study and the structure of the scientific enterprise, Wolfe says, but there are limitations to his approach

See all book reviews for this issue.


DEPARTMENTS

MACROSCOPE

Listening to Resveratrol

Could the famous ingredient of red wine herald a new era in medicine?

David M. Kent

COMPUTING SCIENCE

Calculemus!

Celebrating 25 years of celebrating computation

Brian Hayes

ENGINEERING

Scientists as Inventors*

Often considered distinct, engineering and science are frequently difficult to distinguish

Henry Petroski

MARGINALIA

Why Think Up New Molecules?

Adding to the world of known chemical structures is a wonderful mental experiment

Roald Hoffmann

SCIENCE OBSERVER

Of Sunflowers and Citizens

How are bee populations faring in the United States? A citizen science project will help find out

Anna Lena Phillips

A Light Switch on Cells

A chemical makes neurons turn on and off with light beams

Fenella Saunders

In the News

LETTERS TO THE EDITORS

Face the Other Way
Wait, Don't Tell Me
Blowing Smoke
Quantum Light

SIGMA XI TODAY (PDF)


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