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On the Cover

May-June 2008 Volume 96, Number 3

The ancients called them maria, mistaking the dark patches on the Moon for otherworldly seas. Astronomers of the modern age knew better, of course, but it still came as a surprise when the first crude pictures of the lunar far side (taken by the Soviet Luna 3 probe in 1959) showed it almost bereft of maria. ...


FEATURE ARTICLES

The Two-Faced Moon *

P. Surdas Mohit

Investigators are still struggling to understand why the near and far sides of our celestial neighbor are so fundamentally different


The Neglected Side of Parkinson's Disease *

Ted L. Rothstein, C. Warren Olanow

Shaking and slowness of movement may be the most obvious symptoms, but they are often not the most debilitating ones


Twisting Light to Trap Atoms *

Sonja Franke-Arnold, Aidan S. Arnold

Photons carry a type of angular momentum that can guide, trap and rotate ultracold atoms and particles


Tip-of-the-Tongue States Yield Language Insights

Lise Abrams

Probing the recall of those missing words provides a glimpse of how we turn thoughts into speech and how this process changes with age


* access restricted to members and subscribers


SCIENTISTS’ BOOKSHELF

A 20th-Century Faust

Mark Walker

A review of Von Braun: Dreamer of Space, Engineer of War, by Michael J. Neufeld. This nuanced biography of Wernher von Braun shows that his true genius was as a manager of large, complex science and engineering projects, from the V-2 combat rocket to the Saturn V launch vehicle

See all book reviews for this issue.


DEPARTMENTS

COMPUTING SCIENCE

Wagering with Zeno

A philosopher who did everything by halves may never win, but he won't go broke

Brian Hayes

MACROSCOPE

Winners and Losers in the Animal-Research War

Violent attacks on scientists and their families are becoming more frequent

P. Michael Conn, James V. Parker

MARGINALIA

Jefferson, Buffon and the Moose

To counter the European insult that American species were weak and degenerate, Thomas Jefferson employed scathing rhetoric and a moose from Vermont

Keith Stewart Thomson

ENGINEERING

Twists, Tags and Ties*

Inventors have been attempting to get a grip on things for many decades

Henry Petroski

SCIENCE OBSERVER

A Market for Basic Science?

Clever financial instruments might one day be used to fund fundamental research

David Schneider

Ars Scientifica

An art-science collaboration yields rich insights

Anna Lena Phillips

In the News

LETTERS TO THE EDITORS

Leaping Lizards
Table the Discussion
Safety First

SIGMA XI TODAY (PDF)


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