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On the Cover

January-February 2006 Volume 94, Number 1

A .22-caliber bullet easily penetrates a telephone directory perched on a stool, but the gunshot's effect on the surrounding environment is the photographer's actual target. Turbulence and shock waves can be revealed by specialized high-speed photography technology combined with classical imaging techniques, as Gary S. Settles describes in "High-speed Imaging of Shock Waves, Explosions and Gunshots." ...


FEATURE ARTICLES

High-speed Imaging of Shock Waves, Explosions and Gunshots

Gary Settles

New digital video technology, combined with some classic imaging techniques, reveals shock waves as never before


First Life *

Michael Russell

Billions of years ago, deep under the ocean, the pores and pockets in minerals that surrounded warm, alkaline springs catalyzed the beginning of life


A Bright Future for Subwavelength Light Sources *

Tineke Thio

Generating tiny points of light for such things as storing data on optical disks is aided by a new theory involving evanescent waves


Fallout from Nuclear Weapons Tests and Cancer Risks

Steven Simon, André Bouville, Charles Land

Exposures 50 years ago still have health implications today that will continue into the future


Ancient Lakes of the Sahara *

Kevin White, David Mattingly

The Sahara was once a savannah teeming with life. The story of how the climate changed, and how humans coped, is still being unraveled


* access restricted to members and subscribers


DEPARTMENTS

COMPUTING SCIENCE

Unwed Numbers

Brian Hayes

The mathematics of Sudoku, a puzzle that boasts "No math required!"

MACROSCOPE

Where's the Real Bottleneck in Scientific Computing?

Gregory V. Wilson

Scientists would do well to pick up some tools widely used in the software industry

SIGHTINGS

Needlework

Felice Frankel

Stitching together micrographs results in impressive images of carbon nanotubes

MARGINALIA

Old Gas, New Gas

Roald Hoffmann

Methane—made and taken apart by microbes, in the Earth, by people

ENGINEERING

Levees and Other Raised Ground *

Henry Petroski

Engineering offers options for rebuilding New Orleans, but engineers won't choose which one

SCIENCE OBSERVER

Burn, Magnet, Burn

Fenella Saunders

The sudden flip of a crystal's magnetic field mimics a flame front

Protein World Atlas

Christopher R. Brodie

Pretty pictures mark proteins' province

In the News

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Intelligent Debate

On With the Game

FROM THE PRESIDENT

SIGMA XI TODAY (PDF)


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