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On the Cover

September-October 2005 Volume 93, Number 5

School buses across the United States, such as these lined up to haul students of Edmonds School District #15 near Seattle,Washington, are painted exactly the same yellow color, making the school bus an icon immediately recognizable to adults and children alike. But how do bus ­manufacturers—or any other production companies—ensure that their merchandise conforms to standard colors? ...


 

DEPARTMENTS

COMPUTING SCIENCE

Group Theory in the Bedroom

Brian Hayes

An insomniac's guide to the curious mathematics of mattress flipping

MACROSCOPE

Better Collision Insurance

Russell L. Schweickart, Clark R. Chapman

Asteroids smaller than those now being actively catalogued constitute a largely neglected natural hazard

SIGHTINGS

A Terabyte of a Twister

Felice Frankel

Donna Cox of the National Center for Supercomputing Applications talks about the challenges of working with scientists to create visual representations of severe storms

MARGINALIA

Judging Einstein

J. Donald Fernie

Before most physicists would believe the claims of relativity, they required proofwhich would come in the form of a solar eclipse

ENGINEERING

Next Slide, Please *

Henry Petroski

As the Kodak Carousel begins its slide into history, it joins a series of previous devices used to add images to talks

SCIENCE OBSERVER

Investigating a Mega-Mystery

Amos Esty

Two recent studies try to help unravel the causes of late Pleistocene extinctions

Filling up with Hydrogen

David Schneider

Chemical hybrides can be used to store hydrogen, an approach that may one day give a H2-powered vehicle reasonable cruising range

Water Fight

Fenella Saunders

At very short time scales, is water still H2O?

IN THE NEWS

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Play Ball

Cracking the Code

Scaling the Cycles

More Misfoldings

Expanding on the Collapse

FROM THE PRESIDENT


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