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On the Cover

January-February 2005 Volume 93, Number 1

Using an electronic metal detector, a technician attempts to find land mines placed near the thousand-year-old Banteay Srei temple in Cambodia. Ground-penetrating radar and mine-sniffing dogs are also frequently employed for such dangerous work, but soon mine-removal experts may benefit from equipment based on nuclear quadrupole resonance, a phenomenon that is similar to nuclear magnetic resonance, which forms the basis of MRI imaging. ...


FEATURE ARTICLES

Grass-roots Justice in Tanzania *

Brian Paciotti, Craig Hadley, Christopher Holmes, Monique Mulder

Cultural evolution and game theory help to explain how a history of cooperation influences the success of social organizations


The Star-formation History of the Universe *

Alan Heavens

Different formation histories of large and small galaxies affected the rate at which stars were produced


Explosives Detection with Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance

Joel Miller, Geoffrey Barrall

An emerging technology will help to uncover land mines and terrorist bombs


Exercise Controls Gene Expression

P. Darrell Neufer, Frank Booth

The activity level of skeletal muscle modulates a range of genes that produce dramatic molecular changes—and keep us healthy


The Home of Blue Water Fish *

A. Peter Klimley, John Richert, Salvador Jorgensen

Rather than singly inhabiting the trackless ocean, pelagic fish species travel together in groups, which migrate between hidden, productive oases


* access restricted to members and subscribers


SCIENTISTS’ BOOKSHELF

The Zen of Venn

Frank Ruskey

A. W. F. Edwards's Cogwheels of the Mind offers a personal view of John Venn and his diagrams

See all book reviews for this issue.


DEPARTMENTS

COMPUTING SCIENCE

Naming Names

Brian Hayes

Finding unique sequences in finite name and number sets is becoming increasingly difficult

SIGHTINGS

How "How It Works" Works

Felice Frankel

Frank O'Connell of the New York Times discusses his drawings for the newspaper's technology features

MARGINALIA

Will We Stop at Nothing?

Roald Hoffmann

Science and popular culture mix in Brazil's Carnaval

ENGINEERING

Industrial Origami *

Henry Petroski

Folding newspapers can be seen as a metaphor for using engineering to solve practical problems

SCIENCE OBSERVER

Living in Sunny Times

David Schneider

Recent solar activity appears to have been unusually vigorous

Lessons from Wounded Flies

Christopher R. Brodie

A fruit-fly model of wound healing parses a complex process

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Play It Again

Rocking Heavy Metal

Tempest in a Porcelain Teapot

The Origins of AIDS?

FROM THE PRESIDENT


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