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On the Cover

September-October 2004 Volume 92, Number 5

Polylepis, a genus that includes 20 species of trees superbly adapted to survive at high altitude in the Andes, was once thought to be naturally restricted to boulder fields and steep mountainsides. Since about 1990, however, investigators have realized that Polylepis forests once dominated the cordilleras. ...


FEATURE ARTICLES

Diamagnetic Levitation *

Ronald Pelrine

Known since the 1930s, a simple technique for suspending objects magnetically is just now finding practical application


The Design and Function of Cochlear Implants

Michael Dorman, Blake Wilson

Fusing medicine, neural science and engineering, these devices transform human speech into an electrical code that deafened ears can understand


Cell Fusion *

Brenda Ogle, Jeffrey Platt

Cells of different types and from different species can fuse, potentially transferring disease, repairing tissues and taking part in development


The Lifestyles of the Trilobites *

Richard Fortey

These denizens of the Paleozoic Era seas were surprisingly diverse


The World's Highest Forest *

Jessica Purcell, Alan Brelsford, Michael Kessler

A better understanding of the properties of Andean queñua woodlands has major implications for their conservation


* access restricted to members and subscribers


SCIENTISTS’ BOOKSHELF

The Great Divide

Marc Bekoff

Do animals think? Clive Wynne thinks not.

See all book reviews for this issue.


DEPARTMENTS

COMPUTING SCIENCE

Bugs That Count

Brian Hayes

How do periodical cicadas mark time?

MACROSCOPE

Science as Play

Pierre Laszlo

Should scientific research be fun?

SIGHTINGS

Seeing Stars

Felice Frankel

Astronomy professor Jeff Hester discusses photographing the birth of stars

MARGINALIA

Astronomy and the Great Pyramid

J. Donald Fernie

The key to dating the construction of the Great Pyramid may lie in the stars

ENGINEERING

Lives of the Engineers *

Henry Petroski

These classic works of biography can teach us about much more than just the building of bridges

SCIENCE OBSERVER

TNT and Talking Cells

Christopher R. Brodie

A surprising new means of cellular communication generates a sharp report

Viva La Ciencia

Rosalind Reid, Brian Hayes

Cuba's creative scientists aim to make knowledge their country's sugar substitute

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Brain Surgery

Hypothesis or Theory?

Fish Story

Prints of Tides

FROM THE PRESIDENT


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